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PureRobotics® Tethered Robotic Pipeline Condition Assessment Platform

The PureRobotics platform is a modular, multi-sensor condition assessment tool for depressurized water and wastewater pipelines. Using accurate electromagnetic and other sensor data paired with live video, this platform provides utility owners with comprehensive pipe wall condition data used to make rehabilitation and management decisions on a pipe-by-pipe basis.

With advancements in technology and a willingness to develop proactive pipeline integrity programs, utilities can successfully reduce failures, mitigate risk, reduce capital expenditures, and increase confidence in the overall operation of their force mains.

New standards of best practice for force main management involve a variety of methods and technologies to provide data and information with which to make decisions. Utilities can now often perform a detailed condition assessment while the force main remains in service.

There is no “one-size-fits-all” way of assessing force mains. Any approach should be tailored to risk tolerance, material, diameter and past failure history. Savvy utility managers are turning to programs that reduce damage to assets, prioritize investment to minimize community impact of asset failure, and reduce the consequence of failure by enabling system control.

This white paper will highlight:

  • how to develop a risk-based program
  • the most common modes of failure for force mains
  • how to define which of the three approaches to proactively assessing force mains best fits your goals and risk-tolerance
  • how utilities are finding success using these approaches to: prevent failures, reduce capital expenditures, mitigate risk, optimize budget allocation, and increase confidence and level of service.

While metallic rising mains have been historically difficult to manage, a risk-based approach increases confidence in the condition of the pipeline.

Nothing grabs headline news like the failure of a rising main, which can be extremely damaging to the environment and harmful to a utility’s reputation.

Historically, wastewater rising mains have been difficult to manage, especially those made with ferrous materials, where the failure method is slow when compared to concrete pressure pipe. As well, sewer rising mains have special operational challenges that don’t apply to gravity sewer mains as they typically cannot be taken out of service for inspection, and due to the presence of solids in the fluid, rising mains represent a far more abrasive environment than potable systems such that assessment methods for water mains may not be applicable.

The presence of pockets increases the potential of corrosion in metallic pipes.

Gas pockets are of significant concern in rising mains.

The primary failure mechanism of ferrous rising mains is due to internal corrosion. Gas pockets are of significant concern in rising mains, as concentrations of hydrogen sulfide gas within wastewater can be subsequently converted to sulfuric acid by bacteria in the slime layer on the pipe wall. This may cause corrosion and eventual breakdown of the pipe’s wall.

Therefore, a first step in assessing rising main condition should be the identification of gas pocket locations within the pipeline.

Pure Technologies has performed an analysis of rising mains inspected using acoustic based technologies in order to better characterize the frequency and location of gas pockets. Based on the analysis, it was found that 72% of gas pockets were not at known high points or air release valves, therefore, the most precise way to identify gas pockets within a rising main is through the implementation of inline acoustic inspection technologies.

The collection of gas pocket locations alone will not indicate the condition of the pipeline, but instead identifies locations where an increase in corrosion potential is observed. To ascertain the true condition of a pressure pipe, higher resolution electromagnetic technologies are required. These technologies measure pipe wall thickness in ferrous materials and broken wire or bar wraps in concrete pressure pipe.

Once the condition data is collected, advanced analytics can be applied to estimate the pipeline’s remaining useful life.

“Previous analyses involved straight-line assumptions – comparing the pipe wall thickness at installation against what it is today. However this doesn’t give an accurate picture of how pipes degrade…by using statistical modeling we can develop a more predictable degradation rate based off of over 14,000 miles of inspection data Pure has collected over the past 30+ years.”

Jennifer Steffens, Market Sector Leader, Water and Wastewater, Pure Technologies

Jennifer Steffens, Market Sector Leader, Water and Wastewater, Pure Technologies

Desktop studies are not always reliable.

While often the first thought is to replace the aging wastewater assets based on factors such as age and failure history, this option makes neither logical nor financial sense. With so many miles of buried pipelines and such limited capital budgets, utilities don’t have hundreds of millions to spend on replacing pipelines which still have remaining useful life.

At Pure Technologies, we believe there is a better way. A more feasible approach to ensuring the safe operation of rising mains is to undertake a risk-based approach to manage their operation. A risk-based approach will provide decision intelligence on which assets require rehabilitation or replacement to extend their useful life. Or which assets can be left alone.

Our approach is to help utilities evaluate the current state of their buried infrastructure and provide them with high confidence condition and operating data.   We then couple this with our years of extensive experience and project history (more than 12,000 kilometers of pressure pipe assessment) to provide utilities with actionable information, which allows them to make informed decisions as to the management of these critical assets.

Value of a risk-based approach to manage rising mains.

Utilities that embrace a risk-based approach to manage their rising main inventory have found that on average they can safely manage their rising mains for roughly 5 to 15 percent of the replacement cost. This pragmatic approach focuses on providing real condition data through assessment, which can be used to selectively renew isolated areas of damaged pipe in lieu of capital replacement.

Four steps to a risk-based approach.

At Pure, we recommend a risk-based approach to manage wastewater rising mains by focusing on four main areas:

  • Preliminary Risk Analysis
  • Internal Corrosion Potential Surveys using Inline Acoustics
  • Pipe Wall Assessment using Advanced Technologies
  • Condition Data Analysis and Advanced Risk Assessment

Most common reasons for pipeline failure.

Preliminary analysis.

Preliminary analysis includes collecting the right data to develop a prioritized plan for assessment, including the selection of appropriate technologies. To help make preliminary decisions, Pure collects all available information to understand the history of the pipeline and the likely failure modes. The data analysis will provide an understanding of the construction and context of the pipeline. Data of interest typically includes pipe characteristics, installation factors, environmental and performance-related data, operational data, and failure data.

Acoustic-based SmartBall® tool locates leaks and gas pockets

Acoustic-based SmartBall® tool used to locate leaks and gas pockets.

Sahara is an inline tethered tool that can locate leaks and gas pockets.

Internal corrosion potential survey.

An internal corrosion potential survey uses inline tools to locate gas pockets that can increase the potential for corrosion and eventual breakdown of the pipe wall. Pure Technologies typically deploys its acoustic-based SmartBall® leak and gas detection tool, as well as its tethered Sahara® leak and gas pocket detection platform to locate gas pockets in pressurized lines of all materials.

Pipe wall assessment.

While the presence of gas pockets may indicate areas of potential concern, it will not give a quantifiable answer as to the structural life of the pipe.

Pipe wall assessment is completed using a variety of technology solutions to identify defects and deterioration of the pipe wall in a variety of pipe materials. For pipe wall assessment of metallic rising mains, common internal electromagnetic technologies include the PipeWalker® and PureRobotics® platforms, as well as the free-swimming 24-detector PipeDiver® assessment tool, developed to identify electromagnetic anomalies indicating pipe wall loss.

PipeDiver® assessment tool, identifies electromagnetic anomalies indicating pipe wall loss.

Condition assessment analysis.

Condition data analysis and risk assessment evaluates how to safely renew or extend the life of rising mains. The risk evaluation considers not only the probability of failure (condition) of the rising main based on inspection data, but also the consequence of failure in order to make sound engineering decisions.

Understanding the risk of the pipeline is an important step in selecting and justifying the appropriate condition assessment methods. As the risk of the asset increases, the value of using high-resolution comprehensive assessment techniques increases. Higher resolution data results in more confident decision making, and would justify and prioritize the application of assessment techniques.

Diagnostic analytics helps utilities move risk assessment forward.

In the past, inspections were done, the data analysed, and the results passed on to the utility. Pure Technologies now offers a more holistic program of diagnostic analytics. This includes analysis of what caused the corrosion problem within the pipe wall, what the impact the corrosion has on the life of the pipeline, and a prescriptive analysis of how it needs to be repaired or rehabilitated.

The next step gathering momentum? Predictive analysis to elongate service life.

While metallic force mains have been historically difficult to manage, a risk-based approach increases confidence in the condition of the pipeline.

After the Clean Water Act of the 70s required control of wastewater discharge, an increase in force main construction and management across the country was observed. As these assets are now approaching 50 years in age, reducing the risk of failure has become a major regulatory priority. Nothing grabs headline news like the failure of a force main, which can be extremely damaging to the environment and harmful to a utility’s reputation.

Historically, wastewater force mains have been difficult to manage, especially those made with ferrous materials, where the failure method is slow when compared to concrete pressure pipe.

As well, pressurized sewer mains have special operational challenges that don’t apply to gravity sewer mains as they typically cannot be taken out of service for inspection, and due to the presence of solids in the fluid, force mains represent a far more abrasive environment than potable systems such that assessment methods for water mains may not be applicable.

The presence of gas pockets increases the potential of corrosion in metallic pipes.

Gas pockets are of significant concern in force mains.

The primary failure mechanism of ferrous force mains is due to internal corrosion. Gas pockets are of significant concern in force mains, as concentrations of hydrogen sulfide gas within wastewater can be subsequently converted to sulfuric acid by bacteria in the slime layer on the pipe wall. This may cause corrosion and eventual breakdown of the pipe’s wall.

Therefore, a first step in assessing force main condition should be the identification of gas pocket locations within the pipeline.

Pure Technologies has performed an analysis of force mains inspected using acoustic based technologies in order to better characterize the frequency and location of gas pockets. Based on the analysis, it was found that 72% of gas pockets were not at known high points or air release valves, therefore, the most precise way to identify gas pockets within a force main is through the implementation of inline acoustic inspection technologies.

The collection of gas pocket locations alone will not indicate the condition of the pipeline, but instead identifies locations where an increase in corrosion potential is observed. To ascertain the true condition of a pressure pipe, higher resolution electromagnetic technologies are required. These technologies measure pipe wall thickness in ferrous materials and broken wire or bar wraps in concrete pressure pipe.

Once the condition data is collected, advanced analytics can be applied to estimate the pipeline’s remaining useful life.

“Previous analyses involved straight-line assumptions – comparing the pipe wall thickness at installation against what it is today. However this doesn’t give an accurate picture of how pipes degrade…by using statistical modeling we can develop a more predictable degradation rate based off of over 14,000 miles of inspection data Pure has collected over the past 30+ years.”

Jennifer Steffens, Market Sector Leader, Water and Wastewater, Pure Technologies

Desktop studies are not always reliable.

While often the first thought is to replace the aging wastewater assets based on factors such as age and failure history, this option makes neither logical nor financial sense. With so many miles of buried pipelines and such limited capital budgets, utilities don’t have hundreds of millions to spend on replacing pipelines which still have remaining useful life.

At Pure Technologies, we believe there is a better way. A more feasible approach to ensuring the safe operation of force mains is to undertake a risk-based approach to manage their operation. A risk-based approach will provide decision intelligence on which assets require rehabilitation or replacement to extend their useful life. Or which assets can be left alone.

Our approach is to help utilities evaluate the current state of their buried infrastructure and provide them with high confidence condition and operating data.   We then couple this with our years of extensive experience and project history (more than 12,000 kilometers of pressure pipe assessment) to provide utilities with actionable information, which allows them to make informed decisions as to the management of these critical assets.

The value of a risk-based approach to manage force mains.

Utilities that embrace a risk-based approach to manage their force main inventory have found that on average they can safely manage their force mains for roughly 5 to 15 percent of the replacement cost. This pragmatic approach focuses on providing real condition data through assessment, which can be used to selectively renew isolated areas of damaged pipe in lieu of capital replacement.

At Pure, we recommend a risk-based approach to manage wastewater force mains by focusing on four main areas:

  • Preliminary Risk Analysis
  • Internal Corrosion Potential Surveys using Inline Acoustics
  • Pipe Wall Assessment using Advanced Technologies
  • Condition Data Analysis and Advanced Risk Assessment

Some of the common reasons leading to failure on ferrous pipes.

Preliminary Risk Analysis

Preliminary analysis includes collecting the right data to develop a prioritized plan for assessment, including the selection of appropriate technologies. To help make preliminary decisions, Pure collects all available information to understand the history of the pipeline and the likely failure modes.

The data analysis will provide an understanding of the construction and context of the pipeline. Data of interest typically includes pipe characteristics, installation factors, environmental and performance-related data, operational data, and failure data.

Acoutic-based SmartBall® tool locates leaks and gas pockets

Acoustic-based SmartBall® tool locates leaks and gas pockets.

Sahara is an inline tethered tool used to locate leaks and gas pockets in pressurized lines.

Internal Corrosion Potential Survey.

An internal corrosion potential survey uses inline tools to locate gas pockets that can increase the potential for corrosion and eventual breakdown of the pipe wall. Pure Technologies typically deploys its acoustic-based SmartBall® leak and gas detection tool, as well as its tethered Sahara® leak and gas pocket detection platform to locate gas pockets in pressurized lines of all materials.

Pipe Wall Assessment.

While the presence of gas pockets may indicate areas of potential concern, it will not give a quantifiable answer as to the structural life of the pipe.

Pipe wall assessment is completed using a variety of technology solutions to identify defects and deterioration of the pipe wall in a variety of pipe materials. For pipe wall assessment of metallic force mains, common internal electromagnetic technologies include the PipeWalker® and PureRobotics® platforms, as well as the free-swimming 24-detector PipeDiver® assessment tool, developed to identify electromagnetic anomalies indicating pipe wall loss.

PipeDiver® assessment tool identifies electromagnetic anomalies indicating pipe wall loss.

Condition Assessment Analysis.

Condition data analysis and risk assessment evaluates how to safely renew or extend the life of force mains. The risk evaluation considers not only the probability of failure (condition) of the force main based on inspection data, but also the consequence of failure in order to make sound engineering decisions.

Understanding the risk of the pipeline is an important step in selecting and justifying the appropriate condition assessment methods. As the risk of the asset increases, the value of using high-resolution comprehensive assessment techniques increases. Higher resolution data results in more confident decision making, and would justify and prioritize the application of assessment techniques.

Diagnostic analytics helps utilities move risk assessment forward.

In the past, inspections were done, the data analysed, and the results passed on to the utility. Pure Technologies now offers a more holistic program of diagnostic analytics. This includes analysis of what caused the corrosion problem within the pipe wall, what the impact the corrosion has on the life of the pipeline, and a prescriptive analysis of how it needs to be repaired or rehabilitated.

The next step gathering momentum? Predictive analysis to elongate service life.

 

Case Study

The Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission (WSSC) is the 8th largest water and wastewater utility in the United States, serving over 460,000 customer accounts and 1.8 million residents in Montgomery and Prince George’s County, Maryland (suburban Washington D.C.).

WSSC operates nearly 5,500 miles of water mains, with approximately 145 miles comprised of large-diameter Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Pipe (PCCP) equal to or greater than 36-inches in diameter.

Project Details

Services
SmartBall®
Acoustic Leak Detection
PipeDiver® – Condition Assessment
PureRobotics® – Pipeline Inspection
SoundPrint® AFO – Acoustic Fiber Optic (AFO) monitor­ing
Timing
2014
Pipe Material
PCCP
Inspection Length
145 miles
Diameter
36-inches

Project Highlights

The Assess & Address cost was roughly 6% of the capital replacement estimate of $2 billion

95% of the pipes inspected by Pure Technologies have no deterioration at all

Pure has identified less than 2% of pipes in need of immediate repair

A capital replacement program would have replaced a large amount of pipe in good condition

Challenge

After WSSC began experiencing major PCCP failures in the 1970s, it developed a strong commitment to infrastructure management technology in favor of large capital replacements. Beginning in 2007, WSSC and Pure Technologies began a partnership to create a comprehensive PCCP management program.

Pure Technologies Assess & Address approach to pipeline management is built on extensive research and data from over 8,000 miles of pressure pipe inspection which has found that less than 1 percent of pipelines need immediate repair. Assess & Address programs focus on identifying vulnerable areas of a pipeline and completing selective rehabilitation and replacement in favor of full-scale capital replacement, often saving the utility millions of dollars.

Solution

Pure Technologies uses several solutions for WSSC’s PCCP management program that effectively inspect the pipeline for leaks, gas pockets, and structural deterioration. Pure also provides real-time monitor­ing of the pipelines to alert the WSSC when indi­vidual pipe segments experience prestressed wire breaks and are approaching a high risk of failure.

Pure’s SmartBall® Acoustic Leak Detection Technol­ogy is used to identify leaks and pockets of trapped gas, allowing for proactive repair. The SmartBall inspection tool is a non-destructive, free-swimming technology that measures the acoustic activity associated with leaks and gas pockets in pressurized pipelines. Early identification and repair of leaks and gas pockets reduces water loss and structural deteri­oration and is crucial in understanding the baseline condition of a pipeline. Pure Technologies regularly deploys SmartBall leak detetction as part of the pro­gram having identified several major transmission mains leaks within WSSC’s system to date.

WSSC Pipelines are also inspected for structur­al deterioration using several of Pure’s platforms. Manned visual and sounding inspections of dewa­tered pipes help identify visible structural damage like corrosion, delamination, and cracking. Pure also uses PipeDiver® and PureRobotics® Electromagnet­ic (EM)Technology Platforms to locate and quantify broken prestressing wires in each pipe section.

Information from these inspection techniques are combined to provide actionable information (including structural modeling and analysis), which allows WSSC to safely manage their PCCP inventory while minimizing renewal projects.

In addition to regular condition assessment, WSSC began using Acoustic Fiber Optic (AFO) monitoring in 2007. Ultimately, the program will monitor up to 145 miles of 36-inch and larger PCCP within WSSC’s system.

AFO technology monitors the condition of PCCP by tracking the amount of wire breaks in each pipe section. The system allows WSSC to monitor pipe­line deterioration and see at-risk pipes before they fail. As wire breaks occur, the data is analyzed and reported to WSSC by e-mail and advanced GIS and web-based reporting systems, allowing for real-time management of WSSC’s system.

Results

While WSSC’s PCCP program is one of the largest and most advanced infrastructure management programs in the industry, the cost of Pure Technologies Assess & Address model is roughly 6 percent of the $2-billion capital replacement estimates.

To date, Pure Technologies inspections have shown that about 95 percent of WSSC’s pipes are in “like new” condition and less than 2 percent require any immediate rehabilitation or replacement. By identifying select distressed areas, WSSC was able to avoid a full replacement program and avoided massive capital replacement costs by rehabilitating the identified sections.

Since the program’s inception, no PCCP failures have occurred for any transmission main managed under the program.

In North America, the material and size of pipes that make up water and sewer networks range widely. Because these pipeline systems are so complex, it requires a strategic approach based on risk and real data for effective long-term management.

Worker inspecting pipe

Historically, however, it has been challenging to gather real data that can shape defensive capital decisions for an entire system. The assessment of metallic pipelines — which make up most water and pressurized sewer networks — differs from prestressed concrete cylinder pipes (PCCP), both in terms of failure modes and in the fact that metallic pipe materials are featured in both transmission and distribution networks.

While PCCP assessment and management have been successfully used by utilities for years, effective assessment solutions for ferrous pipe have only recently been commercialized.

In 2011, Pure Technologies began an initiative to help close the gap in metallic pipe assessment technologies, and focus attention on gathering honest feedback from proactive utilities on what solutions are needed to effectively manage metallic pipe.

Seven years later, Pure Technologies reports that notable progress has been made with the development and advancement of assessment technologies for metallic pipeline networks.

Team of workers with a metallic pipe

Many proactive utilities involved in guiding Pure’s research efforts

Proactive utilities have been involved in the metallic pipe initiative, and instrumental in the development of new inspection tools for metallic pipe, both by providing feedback that helps guide research and development, and by providing opportunities that allow solution testing in live operating conditions. As a result of these efforts, there has been significant improvements to the technologies available to utilities for assessing the condition of metallic pipelines in both transmission and distribution networks.

For large-diameter transmission mains, there is a well-developed business case for assessing these mains as they approach the end of their useful life. These pipelines typically carry a high replacement cost and are higher risk — due primarily to their size and criticality — making it important for utilities to fully understand the condition of the asset.

Armed with real condition data, utilities can make a defensible renewal or replacement decision about the pipeline. Based on well over 14,000 miles of data, Pure Technologies has found that only a small percentage of pipes are in need of immediate renewal.

Small diameter metallic pipe leak

Case for using inline tools for small diameter pipelines

In distribution networks, however, the case for condition assessment is more challenging as smaller pipelines can sometimes be replaced cost-effectively. Despite this, the process for making a replacement decision should be based, whenever possible, on risk and real data.

With the EPA suggesting that between 70 and 90 percent of pipes being replaced have remaining useful life, the case is even stronger for collecting condition data to drive the decision making to help utilities spend their replacement dollars more efficiently and avoid replacing pipe with remaining useful life.

In some instances with smaller diameter pipes, it is often cost-efficient to use inline tools to gather detailed screening data on a pipe-by-pipe basis to determine if replacement is necessary.

A new approach to metallic pipeline management

While there is no silver bullet technology for assessing metallic pipelines, Pure has developed a flexible, risk-based approach to help utilities better understand their infrastructure, gather actionable data and prioritize both short and long-term management efforts.

Over the past few years, Pure has worked along proactive utilities to develop its data-driven Assess and Address® approach, which focuses on four main areas:

  • Understand
  • Assess
  • Address
  • Manage

Through the implementation of programs across North America, Pure has found that the majority of pipelines 16 inches and above can be cost-effectively managed for between 5 and 15 percent of the replacement cost.

Starting an effective pipeline management program

The first step of any pipeline management program is understanding the system-wide risk along with the benefits and limitations of assessment solutions. This allows for the development of a defensible management strategy that can be implemented to maintain and extend the life of the assets.

Many technologies now exist to provide a snapshot of a pipeline condition at various levels of confidence. It is therefore prudent for utilities to approach technology selection and subsequent analysis based on the risk of each pipeline.

A more thorough risk assessment involves estimating the Consequence of Failure (CoF) and the Likelihood of Failure (Lof) of each pipeline based on internal knowledge, operational history and pipeline characteristics. This initial risk assessment determines which areas of the system require further assessment to acquire real condition data and provides the utility with the necessary information to make an informed technology selection.

By using risk to guide management strategies, owners can ensure they are implementing the right approach, at the right time, with the lowest financial impact. The goal of a management program should always be o focus resources on managing the asset while safely getting the most service life out of the pipeline.

Sinkhole in a street

Reducing the Consequence of Failure

Reducing CoF comes down to improving emergency events through field operations efficiency. Studies have shown that the time to shut down a pipeline had more impact on the consequence of failure than the diameter of the pipeline.

Utilities can reduce CoF — and in turn risk — by gaining a better control on their system, which can be achieved two ways:

  • 1. Adding valves and redundancy in the system
  • 2. Knowing the location, condition and operability of control points

For example, if a pipe fails and utility operations staff are unable to locate valves — or the valves are inoperable when they are located — it will take longer to isolate a pipe failure. This will result in greater damage, more water loss and longer outages and repair times as a result of the failure. Implementing a proactive program for control assets that focus on providing better data for field staff reduces CoF by decreasing emergency response time.

Reducing the Likelihood of Failure through condition assessment

Many factors influence the likelihood that a pipeline will fail. Metallic pipelines, specifically, have a variety of failure modes and require a wide array of technologies to accurately assess their condition. Until recently, technologies for metallic pipe assessment have been unavailable or limited in their viability.

As a result, lower risk metallic mains have historically been prioritized for replacement using age, material and break history, while higher risk mains have sometimes been assessed with test pits along the length of the pipeline. After test pitting, statistical methods are used to extrapolate the condition of the test pit locations along the entire pipe length.

Through the development of metallic assessment solutions, condition data shows that pipe distress is often random and localized, meaning that an area of distress identified during the test pit method may inaccurately identify the entire pipeline as distressed, conversely, identify the entire length of pipeline as in good condition.

The development of reliable inline condition assessment tools provides owners with pipe-by-pipe data that gives a more complete picture of the actual condition of the pipeline. This allows for a more targeted management of small sections of pipe instead of generalizing the condition of an entire pipe length. It also allows for the collection of real data to drive pipeline renewal, which allows for more defensible capital decision making.

Case Study

This preeminent steel producer is a North American leader in advanced steel manufacturing technology. Typical to most steel processing plants, this mill uses recirculated water for a broad variety of purposes, including cooling the blast furnaces, quenching slag, and drawing heat from the overall hot plant environment.

Project Details

Services
PureRobotics® electromagnetic condition assessment
PureRobotics® HD-CCTV inspection
Risk assessment and prioritization
Single day mobilization and inspection
Timing
2015
Pipe Material
Lined Cylinder and Embedded Cylinder Pipe (Types of PCCP)
Inspection Length
0.68 miles
Diameter
48-inch & 54-inch
Transmission Type
Recirculating Water

Project Highlights

0.68 miles (1.09kms) total distance inspected

117 pipes inspected

31 pipes with broken wire wraps

25 repaired and replaced pipes

Challenge

The lines used for recirculating water play a critical role in the operation of a steel plant. When the mill scheduled a brief operational shutdown, they wanted to quickly understand the true condition on a section of their return and supply lines in order assess and prioritize risk and rehabilitate any problem pipes.

On June 2015, the steel mill engaged Pure Technologies Ltd. (Pure) to conduct a non-destructive evaluation of the prestressed concrete cylinder pipe (PCCP) sections in the 48 inch Recirculating Water Return (RWR) and the 54-inch Recirculating Water Supply (RWS) Lines.

The inspected portion of RWR Line is composed of single wrap lined cylinder pipe (LCP). The inspected portion of RWS Line is composed mainly of single wrap embedded cylinder pipe (ECP) without shorting and a short section of single wrap LCP. The pipes were manufactured in 1981.

Pure Technologies previously inspected the 48-inch RWR Line in July 2009 and January 2010 and the 54- inch RWS Line in January 2010. To facilitate a direct comparison between past and current inspection results, the data from the 2010 inspection was reviewed to ensure data analysis continuity.

Solution

The purpose of the single day inspection was to locate and identify pipes that have broken prestressing wire wraps, using Pure’s electromagnetic inspection technology. An electromagnetic inspection provides a non-destructive method of evaluating the baseline condition of the prestressing wire, the structural component that provides the pipe’s strength.

Since the line was dewatered, the survey requirements would also include a visual inspection, which led Pure to recommend the tethered PureRobotics platform, as it is equipped with a high definition CCTV camera to deliver a live video stream from inside the pipe.

The robotic transporter is designed to carry a variety of sensors and tools and can travel a total of 2.9 kilometers from a single point of access. With the new generation of robot, the speed is doubled to 85 feet per minute, which greatly improves efficiency in the field, a huge benefit during time-critical shutdowns.

The inspection went off without a hitch, as crews from the plant had earlier prepped all access points. Pure simply set up a tripod with a chain fall, and lowered the tethered robot through a manhole into the pipe to begin the inspection journey.

Results

Overall, the survey was a low effort, little disruption inspection, conducted in less than a day.

The inspection covered a cumulative distance of 0.68 miles and spanned a total of 177 pipes.

Of these pipes, 25 are replacement pipes or have been previously repaired using carbon fibre.

Analysis of the data obtained during the inspection determined that out of the remaining 152 pipes, 8 pipes in the 48- inch RWR Line and 23 pipes in the 54-inch RWS Line displayed electromagnetic anomalies consistent with prestressing wire damage, ranging from 5 to 40 broken wire wraps.

With the actionable information delivered by Pure, the mill was able to learn about the current condition of their critical assets, and strategize rehabilitation and repair initiatives that meet the goals of their production. In the end, effective asset management using the latest tools and strategies helps reduce costs through targeted spending.

Case Study

Following a water main break in 2009 that resulted in the loss of 15 million gallons of treated water, LWC began a Transmission Assessment Program, using various assessment technologies from Pure Technologies.

Project Details

Services
PureRobotics® electromagnetics (EM) condition assessment

PureRobotics HD-CCTV inspection

Inertial measurement unit for GIS component

Risk prioritization

Timing
2015
Pipe Material
PCCP
Inspection Length
3.4 miles (5.5 kms)
Diameter
24-30 inches (610-760mm)
Transmission Type
Water

Project Highlights

EM data identified 17 anomalies warranting further investigation

HD-CCTV identified longitudinal cracks consistent with overloading

One (1) pipe section found to display anomalous EM signals associated with broken wire wraps and wall cylinder loss

Challenge
In the summer of 2015, LWC deployed PureRobotics to assess 3.4 miles of 24 to 30-inch transmission mains in its network. With 4,100 miles of pipeline to maintain, (200 miles of it transmission main) LWC focused its condition assessment on its transmission main system – pipes that would cause the greatest amount of damage in the case of failure. The loss of non-revenue water, either chronically in small amounts or from a catastrophic failure, can result in massive costs to a water utility.

By prioritizing the risk levels associated with their transmission main system, LWC has created an ongoing inspection program to keep a watchful eye on the health of their pipelines. The program utilizes a number of Pure Technologies assessment tools to find active leaks as well as potential future threats.

Solution
In May of 2015, PureRobotics was deployed on the Cross County Header, Ray Lane Easement Pipeline, and Bardstown Road Pipelines. The latest generation robotic crawler is designed to carry sensors and tools up to 1.8 miles (2.9 kilometers) through potable water or wastewater at a speed of 85 feet per minute. For LWC, PureRobotics used CCTV to provide a comprehensive high-definition visual inspection.

The robotic crawler was also outfitted with specialized tools to conduct an electromagnetic assessment on the condition of the pipeline and inertial measurement unit (IMU) for the GIS component. The Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) deployed with PureRobotics uses a series of Fiber Optic Gyroscopes (FOGs) and accelerometers to track depth, lateral and horizontal movements from a known GPS reference point. The output is a GIS spatial map of the pipeline which depicts elevation changes as well as notable features of interest encountered during the inspection.

Pure’s electromagnetic assessment uses transformer coupling to detect anomalous regions in the pipe cylinder and prestressing wires. This data is correlated with odometer readings from the PureRobotics umbilical tether as well as HD recorded CCTV and IMU to attempt to locate areas of distress in the pipeline.

Results
High definition CCTV inspection results showed a number of longitudinal cracks consistent with overloading. These types of mortar cracks may eventually lead to corrosion of the steel cylinder or prestressing wire and eventually a failure of the pipe.

One pipe section in the Ray Lane Easement pipeline was found to display anomalous electromagnetic signals showing a significant number of broken prestressing wire wrap breaks as well as cylinder wall loss. This was correlated with visual data, showing spalling and exposed steel at the invert of the pipe. LWC intends to investigate this issue at a later date.

Visual assessment also showed a number of pipe sections with spalling. Pure recommended continued monitoring at these locations during future inspections. Electromagnetic assessment also found 11 pipes with anomalous signals not consistent with wire breaks. Investigation performed on one of these anomalous pipes showed a non-standard metal sleeve used in manufacturing. From this information, it was determined that the remaining 10 anomalous pipes could be left in service.

As one of the first utilities to deploy the third generation PureRobotics platform, LWC now has defensible data to move forward with its ongoing rehabilitation program.

Case Study

The City of Calgary provides water and wastewater services for more than 1 million people in the Greater Calgary area. For many municipalities, accurate and regular condition assessment of large-diameter pressure pipelines has become more important in recent years as these assets continue to age and risk of failure increases.

In Calgary, three critical feedermains (14th Street/North Hillhurst, John Laurie and Top Hill) are each constructed of different materials: lined cylinder pipe (LCP), prestressed concrete cylinder pipe (PCCP) and bar wrapped pipe (BWP). The pipes range from 750mm (30-inch) to 900mm (35- inch) in diameter.

Project Details

Services
PureRobotics® electromagnetic condition assessment

PureRobotics® HD-CCTV inspection

Risk Prioritization

Timing
2015
Pipe Material
PCCP, LCP, BWP
Inspection Length
4.74 km (2.9 miles)
Diameter
750mm-900mm (29-35 inch)
Transmission Type
Water

Project Highlights

Condition assessment on 2.92 miles (4.7 kms) of feedermain pipes

Data identified 8 pipes with electromagnetic anomalies consistent with broken pressing wire wraps

HD-CTTV identified 3 pipes with damaged internal mortar and exposed cylinder

Challenge
In an annual condition assessment program, The City inspects its PCCP, BWP and LCP for deterioration. By identifying isolated pipe sections with deterioration, the City is able to make selective repairs in favor of full-scale replacement, which comes at a high cost and may replace sections with significant remaining useful life.

In data collected from more than 14,000 miles of pressure pipe condition assessment, Pure Technologies has found that only a small percentage of pipes (less than 5 percent) are in need of repair and therefore have years of service left. Condition assessment data also suggests that pipe distress is localized, and significant ROI can be achieved by locating and addressing isolated problems through structural inspection.

Solution
To inspect the three feedermains, the City deployed PureRobotics®, a tethered robotic system that delivers live video, and is equipped with electromagnetic technology that can be configured to inspect a variety of pipelines and materials with different operational conditions.

In BWP, the technology identifies and locates broken bars and areas of corrosion on the steel cylinder, which are the main indication this type of pipe will eventually fail. Although BWP looks similar to PCCP in cross section, the design and materials are significantly different.

PCCP is a concrete pipe that remains under compression because of the prestressing wires, with the thin-gauge steel cylinder acting as a water membrane. With BWP, the cylinder plays a much larger role in the structural integrity of the pipe. BWP is essentially designed as a steel pipe with mild steel used to manufacture the steel cylinder and steel bars. PCCP utilizes mild steel for the cylinder, but high strength steel is utilized for the wire, which is wrapped under high tension. As a result, the bar in BWP and wire in PCCP respond differently to environmental conditions that facilitate corrosion.

The high strength steel wire in PCCP is smaller in diameter and wrapped under higher tension, therefore corrosion makes it quite vulnerable to breakage. The mild steel bars in BWP are thicker in diameter and wrapped under less tension, therefore corrosion takes significantly longer to lead to breakage. The type of failure is also much different; PCCP tends to fail suddenly with a large dispersion of energy. This type of failure is less likely in BWP where failures are similar to steel pipe with long periods of leakage occurring prior to rupture. Because of the differences in make-up, BWP and PCCP are inspected using unique methods to determine their structural condition.

Results
Of the 694 pipes cumulatively inspected over the 4.74 kilometers, eight (8) pipes were identified with electromagnetic anomalies consistent with broken prestressing wraps. Additionally, two (2) pipes were found with an anomalous signal not characteristic of broken bar wraps that can be attributed to a change in the pipe cylinder.

Evaluation of the John Laurie Boulevard Feedermain concluded that one (1) pipe was identified to have an anomalous signal likely caused by a non-uniform cylinder. Images obtained from the robot indicated this pipe has damaged internal mortar and exposed cylinder. Additionally, two (2) pipes on this feedermain were identified to have damaged internal mortar and exposed cylinder, but did not contain anomalous signals.

The City of Calgary was pleased with the results, and through condition assessment, has been able to identify and address individual distressed pipe sections on otherwise serviceable feedermains. This has allowed the City to avoid potential ruptures, while increasing service reliability and useful life of the feedermains.

For utilities with large-diameter networks, waiting for failures to occur before repairing or replacing highly critical mains is not an option.

Massive pressured water lleak on a street

With a large amount of buried water infrastructure reaching the end of its service life, operators have every incentive to take a proactive approach to asset management.

Nowhere is this more critical than in busy urban centres. The fallout from an unexpected failure can have major societal costs, and greatly diminish public confidence in the utility.

Asset management begins with condition assessment

Successful asset management begins with condition assessment, the point at which problems and challenges are understood and shaped into definitive plans from both an operational and financial perspective.

To proactively address their pipeline conditions, operators today have access to variety of tools, technologies and engineering analysis that allow for a comprehensive condition assessment of large-diameter pressure pipes, for both water and wastewater systems.

“Unfortunately there is no ‘silver bullet’ with regard to condition assessment technologies,” said Mike Wrigglesworth, Senior Vice President of Pure Technologies. “Each pipeline is unique, and no single technology is the fix for all situations. A combination of factors, from pipe material to soil conditions, operational challenges, age, installation and third party factors will all play a role in the likelihood of failure. Combined with the consequence of failure, a risk-based approach can then be used to select the best condition assessment tool or technologies.”

Matching assessment technology with the pipeline conditions and project goals

While operators can now deploy a number of data-based tools and techniques to assess pipeline conditions, each technology also comes with varying degrees of limitation. For instance, while magnetic flux leakage (MFL) tools provide the highest resolution data for steel pipe, MFL is of limited value for concrete pipe.

Medium resolution techniques such as electromagnetics can identify localized areas of wall loss on metallic pipes such as ductile iron and steel, but not on cast iron pipe as cylinder thickness is often too thick and material properties vary considerably, negatively affecting results. In both cases, it is often prudent to deploy leak detection technologies, as studies show joint defects lead to leaks, and leaks are precursors to failure.

“Often the best solution is to use different but complementary technologies to collect robust condition data that is then evaluated using engineering analysis against a comprehensive risk of failure versus a consequence of failure analysis.”

Sahara® Leak and Gas Pocket Detection

Pure’s proprietary Sahara® inspection platform is a tethered, multi-sensor tool that can identify acoustic-based leaks, gas pockets and visual anomalies in real time, with no disruption to service.

The Sahara tool features a small parachute that uses the product flow to draw the sensor through the pipeline while being controlled from the surface.

SmartBall® Leak and Gas Pocket Detection

SmartBall® is a multi-sensor tool used to identify a variety of conditions in pressurized pipelines. The tool is easy to deploy through existing pipeline features, and travels untethered with the product flow, collecting information.

The tool’s highly sensitive acoustic sensor can locate small leaks and gas pockets, with typical location accuracy within 6 feet (1.8 m).

PipeDiver® Condition Assessment

PipeDiver® is a free-swimming condition assessment tool that operates while the pipeline remains in service.

Originally designed for use in PCCP, the tool has electromagnetic sensors to identify and locate broken prestressing wire wraps. For metallic pipelines, the optimized PipeDiver has the ability to pinpoint localized areas of wall loss.

The tool is also able to deliver video images from inside the pipe.

PipeWalker™ Condition Assessment

The PipeWalker tool provides a viable option for pipeline condition assessment in situations where the pipe is dewatered or where the option to dewater is available.

The tool is equipped with electromagnetic sensors for detecting wire wrap breaks on PCCP pipes and for detecting corrosion on metallic pipes.

PureRobotics® Pipeline Inspection

PureRobotics® is a depth-rated robotic pipeline inspection system that can be configured to inspect pipe applications 24-inches and larger.

Tethered by a high-strength fiber optic cable, the crawler is capable of performing multi-sensor inspections in dewatered pipes or while submerged in depressurized pipes.

The crawler features HD digital CCTV, and can be equipped with electromagnetic sensors, Inertial Mapping, 3-D LIDAR, LASER, SONAR and other tools upon request.

Matching the level of resolution to the risk of the line

While there are a variety of approaches available for assessing a pipeline’s condition, much of an operator’s effort must go into matching the level of resolution of the approach to the overall risk of the line.

The idea is to put the highest resolution technologies on the most critical lines. In the end, the goal of deploying a particular technology (or complementary technologies) is to identify and locate the areas that need rehabilitation or repair as opposed to wholesale replacement of those lines.

Armed with the right information, operators can determine remaining useful life, and confidently move forward to prioritize and target capital spending, while avoiding failures.

A growing number of proactive municipal utilities and power generating operators across North America are reaping the benefits of deploying the latest robotics crawler from Pure Technologies (Pure) to assess the condition of their pipeline networks and save millions of dollars in water loss and prevented breaks.

Unlike slower, limited-distance crawlers, the third generation robotic transporter can quickly navigate up to 1.8 miles (2.9 kilometres) through potable water with ease, and deliver live video and integrity information that can aid in detecting leaks and other anomalies in underground pipes. Since introduction, the latest PureRobotics® platform has delivered data over more than 186 miles (300 km) of pipe and has been deployed for clients including Austin Water Utilities, The City of Ottawa, City of El Paso and Louisville Water.

“We absolutely crushed our previous distance covered in a single day…”

The rollout of our latest generation robot will deliver additional benefits to our clients by providing detailed, real-time, internal condition data in about half the time as the previous generation,” stated Mark Holley, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of Pure Technologies. “This will reduce our inspection time and correspondingly reduce any facility downtime. In addition, the modular design allows us to customize tools to inspect a broader variety of pipeline sizes and types.


Robot's faster speed important for time-critical shutdowns

 

The PureRobotics pipe inspection system is a modular transporter designed to carry sensors and tools through dewatered pipe or while submerged in depressurized pipes. The advanced robotic crawler is safer than manned inspections, especially where regulations are keeping people out of pipelines in favour of unmanned solutions.

With the new generation of robot, the speed is doubled to 85 feet per minute, which greatly improves efficiency in the field, a huge benefit during time-critical shutdowns.

The standard system features HD digital, pan tilt zoom, closed circuit television for live video streams. The robot can be equipped with a variety of specialized tools including an inertial measurement unit for XYZ mapping geographic information, 3-D LIDAR scanning tools, electromagnetic sensors for assessing the structural integrity of pipelines, or pull condition assessment tools such as 2-D laser technology that can precisely measure a pipeline’s size, shape and level of corrosion.

 

PureRobotics deployed on reclaimed water line for nuclear plant

 

Recently the latest generation PureRobotics platform was deployed during a multi-tool inspection for a reclaimed water line operated by a major U.S. nuclear plant.

Since 1998, the plant has assessed its reclaimed water pipeline using electromagnetic technology(EM) from Pure Technologies to ensure the station continues to operate safely. The inspections cover prestressed concrete cylinder pipes (PCCP) that range from 96 inches to 144 inches in diameter.

The EM inspections are typically performed using the PureRobotics™ delivery platform, or by using manned inspection tools so the pipeline can be visually inspected as well. Electromagnetic inspection provides high quality condition assessment data for understanding the structure integrity of large-diameter pressure pipelines. For the nuclear plant, it is used to assess the number of broken prestressing wire wraps on the PCCP pipeline.

During the latest scheduled EM inspection conducted in 2017, Pure deployed its latest generation robotic crawler.

Robotic crawler beats record and delivers 18,000 feet of condition data in single day

 

What made the inspection so remarkable was the speed of the robot and inspection distance covered during the time-critical shutdown. The inspection set a record for distance covered in a daily inspection, upwards of 18,000 feet of condition assessment footage delivered per day, compared to previous record of 11,000 feet. The robotic inspection covered total distance of nearly 14 miles.

We absolutely crushed our previous distances covered in a single day,” said James Milward, lead developer for the robotic crawler. “The conditions were right, and because we leapfrogged the access points, we finished way ahead of schedule. When you’ve only got a small window of inspection time during a scheduled shutdown, any time saved is a bonus for the client. They were very happy with the outcome.

Good data, faster inspection times, better efficiency, no hiccups, you couldn’t ask for a better inspection project.

Case Study

The Foothill Municipal Water District (FMWD) serves approximately 86,000 people through its member agencies located in the foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains, bordered between the City of Pasadena and the City of Glendale. In March 2013, Pure Technologies (Pure) successfully completed in La Canada Flintridge, a 2.2-mile internal inspection and condition assessment of a 24-inch mortar-lined steel force main to identify broad areas of wall loss.

Project Details

Services
PureRobotics™ electromagnetic condition assessment inspection

PureRobotics HD-CCTV inspection

Structural assessment

Engineering services

Risk prioritization

Timing
2013
Pipe Material
Mortar-lined Steel
Inspection Length
2.2 miles (3.55 km)
Diameter
24-inch (610-mm)
Transmission Type
Water

Project Highlights

EM data identified 17 anomalies warranting further investigation

FMWD selected 2 locations to perform test pitting

Results revealed minimal wall loss and continued operation of water main

Challenge

For utilities like FMWD, which has no redundancy in its system, finding a reliable inspection method that provides condition data for the entire length of a steel pipeline is an important aspect of its condition assessment program.

As well, as part of the condition assessment, a structural evaluation was performed to determine whether the force main design satisfies AWWA M11 “Steel Pipe – A Guide for Design and Installation, fourth edition” standards. The results of this evaluation has helped FMWD determine where to focus more detailed inspections in order to make detailed rehabilitation decisions for this force main.

Solution

To complete the inspection, FMWD used PureRobotics electromagnetic condition assessment equipped with electromagnetic technology and high-definition closed circuit television (HD-CCTV). The platform is a non-destructive, in-line assessment tool that provides screening level wall thickness data in the circumferential and axial directions of metallic pipelines.

The robotics tool used was assembled inside the pipeline and controlled remotely by operators on ground level. This allowed FMWD to maximize the HD-CCTV function as internal features could be closely inspected with the camera. By opting for an inline assessment in favor of traditional metallic inspection methods, FMWD has a baseline condition of the entire 2.2-mile water main.

Results

After reviewing the electromagnetic data, Pure Technologies was able to identify 17 electromagnetic anomalies that warrant additional investigation. Using the resulting information, the top 10 anomalies were ranked based on the strength, area and repeatability of signal loss and visually using HD-CCTV.

FMWD selected two locations to perform test pitting to obtain higher resolution data needed to evaluate rehabilitation or repair needs and determine the remaining useful life of the water main.

Results of the two test pits revealed minimal wall loss and resulted in the continued operation of the steel water main with no rehabilitation required. Ranking the anomalies based on size allowed the prioritization of further inspection based on sound and defensible engineering judgment.

Risk prioritization is an important facet of any condition assessment program because it allows the most urgent needs to be addressed first. By proactively managing its pipeline assets, FMWD is able to continue to deliver quality water to its member agencies in a cost-efficient manner to meet their projected demands.

Louisville Water Tower and Pumping Station house the WaterWorks Museum

To many history buffs, “the prettiest ornamental water tower and pumping station” in the U.S. belongs to Louisville Water Company (Louisville Water). In 1860, the water company, which today provides water to more than 850,000 people in Louisville, Kentucky and surrounding communities, built its first water tower and pumping station in the form of a Greek temple complex.

Today, the Louisville Water Tower and Pumping Station house the WaterWorks Museum, and Louisville Water continues to make history using modern technology from Pure Technologies to assess its extensive water network.

Focused on pipes with the potential to cause the most damage

Following a water main break in 2009 that resulted in the loss of 15 million gallons of treated water, Louisville Water began a Transmission Assessment Program, first deploying Pure’s PipeDiver® technology to conduct a practical and cost-effective way to inspect transmission mains. Over the succeeding years, this program has evolved to include with other assessment technologies from Pure’s toolbox.

Transmission Assessment Program utilizes a variety of assessment tools

In the summer of 2015, Louisville Water deployed PureRobotics to assess 3.41 miles of 24 to 30-inch transmission mains in its network. With over 4,100 miles of pipeline to maintain (200 miles of it transmission main), Louisville Water focused its condition assessment on its transmission main system – pipes that would cause the greatest amount of damage in the case of failure. The loss of non-revenue water, either in continuing small amounts or from a catastrophic failure, can result in massive costs to a water utility.

By prioritizing the risk levels associated with their transmission main system, Louisville Water has created an ongoing inspection program to keep a watchful eye on the health of their pipelines. The program utilizes a number of Pure Technologies assessment tools to find active leaks as well as potential future threats.

In May of 2015, PureRobotics was deployed on the Cross County Header, Ray Lane Easement pipeline, and Bardstown Road pipelines. For Louisville Water, PureRobotics used CCTV to provide a comprehensive high-definition visual inspection. The robotic crawler was also outfitted with specialized tools to conduct an electromagnetic assessment on the condition of the pipeline and inertial measurement unit (IMU) for a GIS component.

The Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) deployed with PureRobotics uses a series of Fiber Optic Gyroscopes (FOGs) and accelerometers to track depth, lateral and horizontal movements from a known GPS reference point. The output is a GIS spatial map of the pipeline which depicts elevation changes as well as notable features of interest encountered during the inspection.

PureEM electromagnetic assessment detects anomalous regions in the pipe cylinder and prestressed wires. This data is correlated with odometer readings from the PureRobotics umbilical tether as well as HD recorded CCTV and IMU to attempt to locate areas of distress in the pipeline.

Anomalous pipe

One of the 11 anomalous pipes excavated.

Due to its mobility, PureRobotics is ideal for multiple isolated inspection runs where a quick setup and breakdown can improve efficiency.  The transporter can be deployed from a number of access styles including valves, open flange, and open pipe. In the case of the Louisville Water inspection, the PureRobotics system was inserted into the pipeline via newly installed vertical gate valves and existing boiler plate style hatches. Inspection lengths varied in length from 70 feet to beyond 2,000 feet.

Staff deploying PureRobotics

Louisville Water deployed PureRobotics to assess its transmission mains.

Results gave Louisville Water the confidence to prioritize its rehabilitation program

High definition CCTV inspection results showed a number of longitudinal cracks consistent with overloading. These types of mortar cracks may eventually lead to corrosion of the steel cylinder or prestressing wire and eventually a failure of the pipe.

One pipe section in the Ray Lane Easement pipeline was found to display anomalous electromagnetic signals showing a significant number of broken prestressing wire wrap breaks as well as cylinder wall loss. This was correlated with visual data, showing spalling and exposed steel at the invert of the pipe.

Visual assessment also showed a number of pipe sections with spalling. Electromagnetic assessment also found 11 pipes with anomalous signals not consistent with wire breaks. Investigation performed on one of these anomalous pipes showed a non-standard metal sleeve used in manufacturing. From this information, it was determined that the remaining 10 anomalous pipes could be left in service.

As one of the first utilities to deploy the third generation PureRobotics platform, Louisville Water now has defensible data to move forward with its ongoing rehabilitation program. For this historic water utility, modern technology really can help.

Utilities Complete Condition Assessment Of Bar-Wrapped Pipe With Smartball®, Pipediver®, And Robotic Platform Tools

By the early 1940s, cast iron pipe was losing its historic cachet as the go-to material for new buried infrastructure. Cast iron’s replacement was bar-wrapped pipe (BWP), and it quickly gained acceptance as a reliable, durable and cost-effective pipe material for use in large-diameter transmission and sewer force mains.

Typically, BWP consists of a welded steel cylinder with reinforcing bars wrapped around the cylinder to provide strength. An internal concrete lining and external mortar coating provide corrosion protection to the steel components. The watertight membrane enables the composite pipe to withstand high internal pressures and the effects of external earth and traffic loads.

Until recently, BWP condition assessment proved difficult

Despite early adoption from many pipeline operators, the downside to BWP has been the difficulty to assess the pipe’s condition, where failures are often precipitated by deterioration of the reinforcing bars and long periods of leakage that often go undetected.

It’s now 70 years later, and the methods to assess the condition of bar wrapped pipe have only been recently developed and commercialized. On this forefront, Pure Technologies is recognized for its toolbox of condition assessment technologies that can identify broad areas of cylinder corrosion and bar breaks.

Two Texas cities join forces to assess shared BWP water supply line

In one specific case, the city of Irving and a partnering agency in North Texas joined together to initiate a condition assessment project of their shared water supply line, made up primarily of bar-wrapped pipe. Constructed in 1955, the 48-inch Jamison Water Transmission Main is a critical non-redundant pipeline that conveys potable water to a combined population of 400,000 residences within the Dallas Fort-Worth Metroplex.

The two agencies worked side by side to implement an Assess and Address™ pipeline inspection protocol to determine the condition of the pipeline and to increase the utilities’ reliability of water delivery.

The condition assessment utilized inline acoustic leak and air pocket detection, robotics with high definition CCTV and enhanced electromagnetic detection, transient pressure monitoring and non-linear Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of the steel cylinder corrosion and broken bar wraps.

The results concluded that 97 percent of the 583 pipes inspected had no detectable damage. Less than 3 percent of the total pipes inspected exhibited minor distress, of which 15 (2.5 percent) pipes exhibited thinner steel cylinder.

Through close collaboration, the two agencies were able to effectively manage a shared asset with the goal of preventing disruptive and expensive pipe failures. The information gained from the assessment will allow for the implementation of a cost-effective, long-term management plan to extend the life of the pipeline.

Trinity River Authority of Texas (TRA) evaluates 8.8 miles of critical BWP transmission main

In a second case involving BWP, Pure collaborated with Trinity River Authority on assessing the condition of a pipeline that is a critical link in the reliable delivery of drinking water to five cities within the Dallas-Fort-Worth Metroplex. The aging pipeline was scheduled for replacement due to previous failures and inability to be removed from service for repairs.

To understand the overall pipeline condition, TRA contracted Pure to inspect and evaluate the pipeline by conducting comprehensive hydraulic, leak detection and condition assessment on 8.8 miles of the 30-inch bar-wrapped pipe.

For the leak and air pocket assessment, TRA used the SmartBall® inspection tool, a non-destructive, free-swimming technology that measures the acoustic activity associated with leaks and gas pockets in pressurized pipelines. Regular leak detection inspections can help utilities identify leaks that may not be visible at the surface.

Increased reliability, reduced capital costs

For the structural inspection, TRA used PipeDiver®, a free-swimming electromagnetic tool that identifies bar breaks and broad areas of cylinder corrosion in BWP using PureEM technology while the line remains in service.

The inspection of the BWP identified 14 pipes with bar break damage and 72 pipes with electromagnetic anomalies resembling cylinder defects out of 1284 inspected pipes. By repairing specific pipe sections with deterioration, TRA was able to avoid replacing the entire pipeline at a high capital cost and continue providing reliable service to customers in the region.

A ruptured sewer pipe can attract a lot of unwanted attention, even when it happens on private property. Last year, hours before celebrities were to arrive at the Golden Globes Awards show at the Beverley Hills Hotel, a reputed sewer pipe burst, spewing a mess of wastewater on the red carpet, according to media reports. When large pipes fail, it’s usually breaking news. And when the failed pipeline is part of a pressurized wastewater force main network, repercussions to the environment and the public have the potential to be catastrophic, with fallout to a utility’s reputation. In Canada, pressurized force mains that carry sewage make up only about 7.5 percent of the typical wastewater system compared to gravity mains. Because sewer force mains tend to run constantly, and often operate without redundancy, there is little opportunity to assess the pipes. When problems arise, and a critical force main is out of commission, the entire wastewater system can stop, causing overflows or the need to implement costly bypass pumping. Worse still, pollution generated by a raw sewage leak can flood to the surface and into a watercourse. Clean-up costs can be staggering and environmental impacts can be devastating.

PureRobotics device

The PureRobotics platform can assess the structural integrity of force mains and provide inline video to observe internal pipe conditions.

Force mains have unique signs of impending failure

Internally, force mains have unique warning signs of failure. Because of the sewage flow, trapped gas pockets can allow concentrations of hydrogen sulfide gas to be released from solution and subsequently convert to sulfuric acid by bacteria on the pipe wall, leading to corrosion of the pipe wall. As the pipe wall corrodes internally, it becomes weaker and more likely to fail unexpectedly. While corrosion and defect failures on sewer pipelines are a fact of life for wastewater utilities, these failures do not occur systemically. As a result, knowing when to replace and when to preserve assets through close inspection is more critical than ever.

SmartBall with extraction tool and controls

Managing force mains proactively can help utilities prevent environmental regulation violations that are expensive to mitigate.

Addressing the high consequence of failure in wastewater pipes

Aging pipes, increasing costs of failures and high replacement costs represent significant challenges facing force main owners. As a result, utilities have come to rely on Pure Technologies for its suite of technologies that can identify the weak links. Selective rehabilitation of force mains maximizes the life of the asset, typically at 10-15 percent of replacement costs. Pure’s strategy employs a risk-management approach that looks at likelihood of failure (LOF) and consequence of failure (COF). LOF variables are related to the chance that a pipe could fail, and include: pipe age, material, operating conditions and soil conditions, among other things. COF variables may include the pipe size, its location, environmental and social consequences of a rupture, interruption to service and tarnished public reputations.

Low risk assessment

For low risk force mains, screening and desktop evaluations such as hydraulic analysis and pressure management within the system are often enough to manage the assets. As risk goes up, however, utilities should look at higher resolution technologies that offer more confidence for higher predictability.

Medium resolution assessment

The SmartBall® Pipe Wall Assessment (PWA) tool is Pure’s best technology for identifying leaks, gas pockets and wall stress locations in metallic sewer force mains. PWA technology looks at pipeline walls affected by loading and bedding conditions, as well as other factors that cause stress on the pipe, including structural damage caused by internal or external corrosion. As the free-swimming SmartBall tool rolls through the pipeline, it collects both acoustic and electromagnetic (EM) data. The acoustic sensor is used to identify the sound of wastewater leaving the pipeline, or more often, the sound of trapped gas at the top of the pipeline. Trapped gas within a force main may lead to internal corrosion and eventual breakdown of the pipe wall which is the primary cause of force main failures. In addition to the acoustic data, the SmartBall platform also collects EM data to identify areas of the pipe wall that are under stress. Areas of the pipe wall with damage will be under more stress than areas with limited or no damage. Stress on the pipe wall can also be caused by other factors such as excessive loading and hard bedding surrounding the pipe. Recent developments in SmartBall technology now allow for the combination of leak and gas pocket surveys with PWA surveys in a single deployment, providing a complete screening tool for force mains. Based on initial surveys using the SmartBall PWA tool, areas where gas pockets overlap with stress anomalies represent the largest area of concern of force main owners, as it indicates a high likelihood of corrosion.

High resolution assessment

In force mains with a higher risk, utilities should also consider assessment with a higher resolution tool in addition to a pre-screening survey that detects anomalous changes. For lines that cannot be taken out of service, Pure can deploy the PipeDiver tool, which uses electromagnetic sensors to detect areas of damage along the pipeline. The inline inspection system is an innovative, free-swimming condition assessment platform specially designed for in-service inspection of pressure pipelines. Configured with PureEM™ sensor arrays, the tool can be used with precision to identify wire breaks in PCCP and broad areas of cylinder corrosion in metallic pipe.

No one solution for every pipe or pipeline

While there is no silver bullet for assessing every pipeline, if a utility has a strong understanding of the risk and operational conditions of different areas in their system, an appropriate and defensible inspection plan can be developed. This process allows force main owners to develop a sustainable long-term strategy for managing their critical force main assets.

Metallic pipes have a long history in distribution systems throughout North America, with cast iron and carbon steel making their debut in the early 1800s. In many states, pipelines deploying the early metal are still in service, including the cast iron water main buried in 1831 beneath what is now Greenwich Village.

Risk prioritization as a starting point

Before undertaking any metallic pipe inspection, a utility should first complete a risk prioritization of all their buried assets, factoring in a variety of consequence of failure (COF) and likelihood of failure (LOF) variables to determine the highest/lowest risk pipelines. A distribution pipe buried in a cornfield probably has a lower risk profile than a water main buried under a children’s hospital.

This first step in risk analysis is critical, and can help determine a prioritized strategy. The higher the risk, the more an operator requires reliable information for an action plan to replace, rehabilitate or inspect the pipes further to gather more precise data.

Using asset risk to guide the management strategies, an operator can feel confident about implementing the right approach, at the right time, with the lowest financial impact. Overall, this strategy ensures long-term service, reliability and safe operation.

Match the technology and inspection method with the risk

This initial process also allows operators to choose the most appropriate inspection method based on different pipe material and operational requirements, including lack of redundancy.

If the analysis ranks the mains as medium to high-risk pipes, it makes sense to utilize medium to high-resolution inspection technologies. High risk pipes are probably more expensive and more difficult to replace, and probably affect more people if taken out of service.

 

Medium Resolution Technology

Pipeline Inspection and Condition Assessment Services

PureEM™

PureEM technology represents a form of non-destructive testing that provides a snapshot of the pipeline`s condition by inducing electric currents/magnetic fields within the pipe to measure an electromagnetic response. By creating these fields, PureEM data identifies specific areas of the pipe wall with large EM anomalies. In the case of metallic pipes, these anomalies typically represent broad areas of corrosion.

Typically, metallic pipes are first assessed with a prescreening tool – including inline leak detection and pipe wall assessment – followed by PureEM testing, using one of three platform tools. This multi-tool approach provides the operator with a variety of condition information that can help inform renewal decisions.

With PureEM manned inspection tools, field technicians have the option enter the pipeline with a PureEM inspection tool (e.g. push cart, bicycle) and traverse the length of the pipeline, inspecting for damage. The tool can be used in dewatered water and wastewater pipelines.

Free-Swimming Pipeline Inspection

PipeDiver®

When configured with PureEM, the free-swimming PipeDiver tool is an effective medium resolution tool to assess areas of damage along a pipeline that is live or can’t be taken out of service due to a lack of redundancy or operational constraints. It is ideal for metallic pipes with a higher consequence of failure, since the tool operates while the pipeline remains in service.

PureRobotics™ – Pipeline Inspection

PureRobotics™

Pure`s long range, multi-sensor robotic inspection vehicles are capable of conducting PureEM inspections on steel and ductile iron pipes. The robotic vehicle can be used in depressurized and partially dewatered and wastewater pipelines.

No one solution for every pipeline

Every pipeline has a unique set of conditions, which is why there is no one silver bullet that works across the board.

However, if a utility has a strong understanding of the risk and operational conditions of different areas in their system, an appropriate and defensible inspection plan can be developed. This process allows operators to develop a sustainable long-term strategy for managing their critical buried assets.

Water and sewer utilities across North America are facing a major funding gap related to their buried pipeline infrastructure. Based on current estimates, utilities do not have enough capital available to fix or replace their aging assets. In addition to the funding gap, utilities are under scrutiny because of increased incidences of pipeline failures that are disruptive to communities and expensive to mitigate.

This new reality has forced utilities to squeeze more remaining life out of existing assets, creating more demand for condition assessment programs that allow utilities to identify specific areas of damage and selectively repair pipelines in favor of full replacement.

Historically, condition assessment has been in the realm of a few specialized firms that respond to high profile pipeline failures; however, the industry has changed and condition assessment is becoming widely used and trusted. This approach has been adopted by many utilities that have successfully managed risk and extended the life of assets for a fraction of the cost of a replacement program.

According to a study by Pure Technologies, the majority of pipelines 16 inches and above can be cost-effectively managed for between 5 and 15 percent of the replacement cost. The study found that pipeline damage is typically not systematic across an entire pipeline, but is usually localized due to factors such as design, manufacturing, installation, environmental, operational or maintenance factors.

Equipped with this information, utilities can be assured that assessing the majority of their mains before replacement can reduce their infrastructure gap and extend the useful life of assets.

However, one question that often gets asked about condition assessment programs is how a utility should choose the right condition assessment solution.

The easiest way to solve this challenge is to employ a risk-based approach to condition assessment using a variety of tools that offer different resolutions.

Staff inserting tools

Defining Risk and Pipeline Priorities

Risk is a measure of the probability and consequence of uncertain future events, in this case, potential pipeline failure. A basic approach can be used to define risk even in complex systems; simply, risk is a product of Consequence of Failure and Likelihood of Failure (CoF x LoF).

Consequence of Failure (COF) refers to the damage a failure would cause based on factors like its location, the amount of users it supplies, and its size and operating pressure. Likelihood of Failure (LOF) refers to the probability of a failure occurring based on factors such as age, pipe material, soil conditions, operating pressure, failure history, among others.

Generally, the Consequence of Failure is well defined by the potential damage a pipeline failure would impose on the surrounding environment and is generally fairly static – or – once defined, it is unlikely going to change rapidly.

With this in mind the key to managing risk, or the possibility that a pipeline could fail, is in understanding the Likelihood of Failure. This can be achieved by quantifying the physical condition of the pipeline and understanding and quantifying the factors that affect the potential for deterioration of the assets.

Once risk is defined, the pipeline inventory can be prioritized which helps in the selection of condition assessment approaches and the application of the appropriate technologies. In general, high-risk pipelines warrant a detailed assessment while low risk pipelines can use lower resolution alternatives.

Using Risk to Select Condition Assessment Techniques

When selecting condition assessment techniques, qualifications and technical judgment should be used in lieu of price. High resolution tools come with a higher cost, but saving money on a low resolution condition assessment is not a responsible alternative for a high-risk main.

For example, the savings gained by selecting a low resolution technology for a large-diameter pipeline with a high CoF are often miniscule in comparison to the repair and capital programming decisions that result from the low resolution condition assessment data. If the data is inconclusive or inaccurate, a utility may unnecessarily invest millions in a capital replacement program that was not required, easily eliminating the savings achieved by selecting the less expensive condition assessment option.

Tech monitoring results

Additionally, the cost of a failure should be considered when selecting a lower-cost assessment for a critical pipeline. The average cost of a large-diameter pipe failure is between US $500,000 and $1.5 million; money saved on lower-resolution assessments can easily be negated by the cost of mitigating a single failure and the resulting reputational damage.

One method of selecting a technology is to compare uncertainty to risk. As mentioned earlier, risk is a measure of the probability and consequence of uncertain future events. When dealing with a high-risk asset, it is important that the solution allows the utility manager to minimize the uncertainty of the condition assessment. More importantly, it is crucial that the utility manager knows the condition of the asset to the best extent possible, particularly in areas where there is a high Consequence of Failure.

Pure Technologies has a suite of condition assessment tools with different resolutions. Our low resolution solutions can provide basic condition data on leaks, air pockets and areas of pipe wall stress that could represent damage. This is a valuable prescreening option for high-risk mains, or alternatively for lower risk mains, can be enough detail for a utility to manage the asset.

Pure’s medium and high resolution tools provide more comprehensive data for higher risk pipe. Our high resolution tools can provide detailed accuracy, for example, locating small pits on metallic pipe. The data collected from both medium and high resolution tools is often used by utilities to create rehabilitation plans for critical mains.

Regardless of the solution provider, it is important that utilities employ a balanced, risk-based approach to condition assessment that uses appropriate tools. The most important factor a utility owner can remember is that there is no silver bullet to assess an entire system.

Small leaks sink big ships – the same can be said for large-diameter pipes in utility networks. While large leaks or ruptures are seen as newsworthy stories accompanied by images of water flowing down the streets; smaller leaks can often be more devastating. Left undetected, they can add up over time, contributing significantly to Non-Revenue Water, and eventually, they too can lead to catastrophic pipeline failures.

Many utilities focus leak detection efforts on locating and repairing large leaks, with less priority being placed on identifying smaller ones. While repairing these large leaks is integral to preventing major failures that are expensive to the utility and disruptive to the surrounding environment; finding and repairing small leaks may present the best opportunity for long-term reduction of NRW loss.

Non-Revenue Water loss in the United States is estimated to be between 14 and 16 percent on average, while some systems are suspected to have revenue loss of up to 40 percent. In developing countries this number is much higher, with NRW loss as high as 65 percent in some areas.

The Benefits of Finding Small Leaks

Identifying and repairing small leaks early in their life may be the best course of action to address the problem of future water loss. Catching a leak while it is small prevents decades of sustained water loss that may not otherwise be detected. Over the years, unreported water loss could mean significant financial loss for the utility. Additionally, utilities that fail to proactively find and fix unreported water main leaks allow a growing backlog of new leaks to occur slowly over time. The result is mounting water loss volumes and “hot spots” in some locations; as a number of small leaks can ultimately lead to a major pipeline failure.

Acoustic leak detection sensors have been developed to run through in-service water trunk mains, bringing the sensor to the leak sound, rather than relying on the leak sound to find the sensor. Inline surveys work exceptionally well on large-diameter water transmission trunk mains, which are often poor at transmitting leak sounds and have limited access points to the pipe.

Inline Leak Detection Case Studies

Inline leak detection services have been proven to reliably identify very small leaks on water trunk mains with pinpoint precision, without requiring the water main to be taken out of service.

Engineering staff from Metropolitana Milanese in Milan were able to reduce their water loss and renew the condition of one of their critical mains by conducting proactive inline leak detection using Pure Technologies’ SmartBall® inline leak detection tool. They found a concentration of eight small leaks in a 240 meter section of pipe, exposing a weak area of pipe that could eventually lead to a critical failure. Metropolitana Milanese was then able to take proactive measures to defend against major ruptures.

SmartBall with case and insertion tools

The SmartBall tool is a free swimming leak detection technology that follows the product flow of the pipeline, picking up acoustic anomalies that identify and locate very small leaks and gas pockets. Because it has very little operational noise, the sizes of the detected leaks are minute. In optimal operational conditions leaks as small as 0.028 gal/min have been detected.

With the ability to detect even smaller leaks at 0.005 gal/min (in optimal conditions), Pure Technologies’ Sahara leak detection platform is another tool that can be deployed. Because it is a tethered system that is operator controlled, it is also able to map the location of the leak within 0.5 meters (3 feet). The Sahara tool simultaneously provides real-time visual inspection of live pipeline conditions thanks to an inline video system that travels along the pipe with the acoustic sensor.

Carried out regularly, comprehensive leak detection programs can not only identify large, potentially catastrophic leaks, but also smaller leaks that over time contribute to NRW and eventually become damaging themselves.

In August 2011, Pure Technologies brought out the redesigned PureRobotics wastewater crawler unit to conduct an electromagnetic inspection on a 42-inch (1050mm) sewer force main for a major utility in Ontario, Canada. Pure was able to inspect 3,400 feet from a single access in both directions of the line. New improvements to the tracks assisted in pushing the crawler through the heavy debris at the bottom of the pipe that would otherwise entrap other robotic inspection systems.

Abstract

Comprehensive condition assessment of wastewater force mains provides significant challenges to owners/operators of collection systems as the ability to shut down or expose the pipeline for a thorough inspection is often impractical due to operational and/or financial considerations. Traditional gravity sewer inspection techniques (i.e. visual-based technologies) do not always transfer easily to their wastewater pressure pipe counterparts and visual assessments do not provide the structural condition of force mains – something that is critical in determining the true pipe condition. Therefore, a different set of inspection tools and assessment techniques is required for force mains.

The most effective strategy to safely manage a force main inventory is to implement a risk-based approach for any data collection, inspection, condition assessment, and management techniques. Using asset risk to guide the management strategies, an owner/operator can ensure they are implementing the right approach, at the right time, with the lowest financial impact. While recent advances in force main inspection technologies, assessment techniques, and repair/rehabilitation methods now allow for substantial extension of existing asset service life, a risk-based approach to their implementation will ensure resources are focused on the correct pipelines. The goal should always be to focus the proper resources in managing the asset while safely getting the most service life out of the force main.

Authors

  • Travis B. Wagner, Pure Technologies Ltd., Columbia, MD, USA
  • Jennifer Steffens, Pure Technologies Ltd., Atlanta, GA, USA

Abstract

Since the late 1990s there have been numerous inspection and monitoring projects focused on identifying and quantifying wire break damage in PCCP water and wastewater pressure mains. The pressing need to identify and manage deterioration of PCCP has resulted in the rapid development of a small but highly focused niche industry of condition assessment of PCCP mains. During this time, there have been various theories and postulations regarding the performance and deterioration of PCCP mains. This paper statistically reviews data from more than 500 miles of electromagnetic inspection and acoustic monitoring that have been performed since 2001 to develop scientifically based conclusions on a variety of topic areas regarding the performance and deterioration of PCCP mains. Topic areas include:

  • The mean for percent of damaged pipe sections (percent of damage) are reported. The industry has many views on the performance of PCCP. This paper reports the percent of damage by reviewing the total number of PCCP sections inspected and those that were reported as having wire break damage.
  • The percent of damage is further evaluated by the year of manufacture binned according to the various AWWA C301 and C304 versions. This includes an analysis of what is the mean percent of damage for pipe manufactured with Class IV prestressing wire.
  • Percent of damage is also compared between embedded cylinder or lined cylinder pipe to determine if one type of design has an improved performance.
  • Percent of damage is also compared for water (including raw water) vs. wastewater mains

Authors

  • Michael S. Higgins, P.E., Pure Technologies, Columbia, MD, USA.
  • Allison Stroebele, P.Eng., Pure Technologies, Columbia, MD, USA.
  • Sana Zahidi, Pure Technologies, Columbia, MD, USA.

Abstract

Bar-wrapped pipe (“BWP”) is commonly used in pressure pipelines due to its reliability, cost effectiveness and durability. Failure of BWP can occur as a result of long term leakage and subsequent corrosion or as a result of leakage and deterioration of the reinforcing bars over time. The failure can also be the direct result of a transient pressure or other sudden catastrophic events.

The consequence of failure may result in a significant disruption of operation and service for a water utility without any warning. This is a concern because assessing the condition of a damaged BWP is very challenging. In this paper, a nonlinear finite element analysis was used to evaluate the performance of a damaged BWP.

For the structural evaluation, stresses and strains developed in the damaged BWP were evaluated. Cracking and spalling of the mortar lining will eventually lead to the corrosion of the steel components. In an effort to account for the steel deterioration, the model was adjusted by reducing the thickness of the steel cylinder. This study investigates the behavior of a deteriorating BWP under various levels of distress and various internal pressures. The results based on a 24-inch pipe transmission main, are used to define criteria to evaluate the performance of a damaged BWP. Based upon the finite element results obtained in this study, suggestions for future work are presented and discussed.

Authors

  • Ali Alavinasab, Pure Technologies, Branchburg, NJ, USA.
  • Muthu Chandrasekaran, Pure Technologies, Columbia, MD, USA.
  • Edward Padewski III, Pure Technologies, Branchburg, NJ, USA.

For water service providers in Texas, providing customers with consistent, reliable access to water is crucial, particularly in the summer months when dry conditions impact the water supply.

In order to ensure that residents receive consistent water supply, the City of Irving and a partnering agency have collaborated in times of need to supply the other with water.

In one specific instance, the City of Irving was able to keep customers of the partnering agency supplied with water from one of its 48-inch transmission mains. The combined effort between the utilities showed excellent organizational cooperation to achieve the most important goal for any utility – finding a way to provide consistent service.

In January 2014, the two agencies teamed up again, this time to assess the critical 48-inch Jamison Main that links the two utilities. The transmission main was constructed in 1955 and is made up primarily of Bar-Wrapped Concrete Cylinder Pipe (BWP). Since its construction, however, the main has had modifications: in 1965 and 1968 sections of Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Pipe (PCCP) were added to accommodate the construction of Texas Stadium, and in 2009, another section of PCCP was added during the reconstruction of Loop 12 Highway.

The Difference Between PCCP and BWP

While BWP and PCCP look similar in cross-section, the pipe materials deteriorate in different ways and therefore are assessed differently.

For BWP, it is important for operators to identify and locate corrosion on the steel cylinder, since it is the main structural component and the bars are made with mild steel and are wrapped under less tension than PCCP; BWP essentially behaves like a mortar-lined and coated steel pipe.

PCCP is a concrete pipe that remains under compression because of the prestressing wires, with the thin-gauge steel cylinder acting as a water barrier. The high strength steel wire in PCCP is smaller in diameter and wrapped under higher tension, therefore corrosion makes it quite vulnerable to breakage.

Electromagnetic inspection tool

Electromagnetic inspection tool

Robotic tool insertion

Pure Technologies staff insert the robotic tool for assessment

As the prestressing wires in PCCP begin to break, the pipe becomes weaker and is more likely to fail catastrophically. It is important to locate and quantify the amount of broken wires in PCCP as they are the main structural component.

Because of the differences, the two materials are assessed using electromagnetic (EM) technology that identifies different signs of deterioration in each pipe.

In BWP, inspections identify both the presence of broken bars – which could indicate corrosion on the cylinder – and broad areas of corrosion on the cylinder itself. This approach allows operators to renew pipe sections with an undesirable amount of corrosion that could lead to pipe failure.

In PCCP, EM technology locates and quantifies the amount of broken wires. This method is extremely effective in identifying pipe sections that are suitable for renewal once the number of wire breaks passes a certain limit.

The Condition Assessment Program

For the Jamison Water Transmission Main assessment, the SmartBall® leak detection and PureRobotics® platforms were used to identify deterioration on both the primary pipe material, BWP, and the added sections of PCCP.

Completing a leak detection survey is an important aspect of a condition assessment project, since leaks are often a preliminary indication of a potential failure location. Pre-screening is particularly important in in BWP, since the steel cylinder is the main structural component and the pipe behaves similarly to a mortar-lined and coated steel pipe.

The leak detection survey identified one acoustic anomaly associated with a leak in 2.7 miles of inspection. The screening of the pipeline helps determine the baseline condition of the asset.

The PureRobotics platform was used for the structural assessment portion of the project. The tool is equipped with PureEM™ technology, which can identify distress on both pipe BWP and PCCP, but also features CCTV and above-ground tracking. By completing a structural assessment, damaged areas of the pipe can be targeted for selective renewal.

The Condition Assessment Program

In addition to gaining a valuable baseline condition of the transmission main, the assessment provided both utilities with more information about the location of additions to the critical transmission main.

The CCTV and line-locating feature were used to identify the exact location of two unknown manholes, which in turn were used as additional tracking locations. With more tracking locations during inline inspection, areas of distress can be more accurately located. The CCTV inspection also identified the location of a 48-inch gate valve and 90-degree bends.

Another challenge surrounding this main was accurate mapping of the sections that were added on after the original construction. Additions or alterations to existing pipelines can sometimes lead to inaccurate drawings. By tracking the tethered robotics tool above the ground using a manned sensor, Irving and its partnering agency were able to map out the relocated portions of the pipeline. This provides valuable information for future maintenance, assessment and renewal programs.

Through close collaboration, these two service providers were able to effectively manage a shared asset with the goal of preventing disruptive and expensive pipe failures. The information gained from the structural assessment will allow for the implementation of a cost-effective long-term pipeline management plan and effectively defer the replacement of the pipeline for the foreseeable future.

 

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Assess & Address Pipeline Management Program

Assess & Address Pipeline Management Program

Pure Technologies is helping utilities manage their buried infrastructure through its Assess & Address which can often be implemented for only a fraction of the capital replacement cost.

Case Study

Case Study: Trinity River Authority of Texas

After completing leak detection and structural condition assessment on 8.5 miles of PCCP and Bar-Wrapped Pipe, Trinity River Authority verified the results of inspection, finding three distressed pipe sections.

Technical Paper

Failure Risk of Bar-Wrapped Pipe with Broken Bars and Corroded Cylinder

This study investigates the behavior of a deteriorating BWP under various levels of distress and various internal pressures. The results based on a 24-inch pipe transmission main, are used to define criteria to evaluate the performance of a damaged BWP. Based upon the finite element results obtained in this study, suggestions for future work are presented and discussed.

Critical large-diameter water transmission mains frequently run beneath city streets in busy urban environments. Like the majority of water infrastructure across North America, these pipes are reaching the end of their design life. However, pipelines in urban environments pose a significantly greater risk and challenge to water utilities.

These pipelines are high-risk because of their high consequence of failure; if a pipe beneath a busy downtown street fails, the repair costs can quickly escalate and the failure causes a massive disruption to businesses and commuters. In some cases, failures in urban environments have cost utilities upwards of $5 million to remediate. A failure not only carries a high repair bill, but contributes to a negative public perception of the utility which can harm consumer confidence and lead to negative public relations.

With such high risk, utilities often prioritize these mains ahead of those with lower consequence of failure. However, because these mains are located in high-traffic areas, assessing them is far more challenging than assessing a linear main in a rural area.

Dealing with above ground obstructions, commuter delays and a lack of access points means that operators need to have close control over inspection technologies. In addition, the technology must provide the best possible information to allow for accurate repair and excavation decisions.

Like other major metropolitan areas, the City of Montréal has aging pipeline infrastructure that runs through its downtown core. In Montréal – one of the oldest cities in North America – this infrastructure is very old and beginning to reach the end of its design life. In order to proactively identify problem areas in its Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Pipe (PCCP) assets, the City is in the midst of an inspection program using advanced non-destructive technologies. In total, the City will assess the condition of over 40 kilometers of PCCP by 2015.

In the majority of cases, assessing the condition of assets to identify problem areas has high value for utilities, since the majority of pipelines have remaining useful life, despite their age. This allows for selective rehabilitation in favour of full-scale replacement. This is particularly important in urban areas, since excavation costs are higher and more disruptive in urban environments.

PureRobotics platform

The PureRobotics platform remains tethered to the surface during inspection. 

Pipe with damaged areas

Verification showed large areas of damage to both the prestressing wires and steel cylinder.

Related Topics

For a large portion of the condition assessment, the City is using the PureRobotics™ platform, since it is ideal for challenging urban environments. The tool remains tethered to the surface during inspection and is controlled by an operator. It also features live high definition video to observe internal pipe conditions. These features allow the City to see internal pipe conditions and closely verify areas with potential problems.

In addition, the tool identifies broken prestressing wire wraps in PCCP. As PCCP ages, the prestressing wires, which make up the main structural component, begin to break due to a number of factors.

The presence of broken wires in PCCP is the main indication that the pipe will eventually fail. Unlike metallic pipe materials that typically fail after a long period of leakage, PCCP is prone to sudden failures when too many wires break in one area. The diagram below demonstrates how PCCP typically fails.

How PCCP Fails

Recently, the City has completed the assessment of just over 17 kilometers of its urban PCCP assets with diameters of 600, 750 and 900 millimeters (24, 30 and 36 inches). Of the 2,798 pipe sections assessed in this 17 kilometers, only 97, or 3.5 percent, have shown evidence of distress. This is slightly below the industry average of 5 percent of pipe sections with distress.

Using condition assessment, the City has been able to identify isolated distress on its critical urban mains, while leaving pipeline assets with remaining useful life in operation.

After completing the initial phases of condition assessment, the City has excavated certain sections of pipe for validation of the inspection results, as well as repair of any damage.

Both the excavation locations and presence of distress have been very accurate. This has allowed the City to repair isolated pipe sections, which restores the overall condition of the pipeline. This will help to prevent failures that would significantly disrupt day-to-day life in the city.
In addition, the City now has a baseline condition of all of the assessed pipelines, which helps in the development of future capital planning for monitoring or re-inspection.

By proactively assessing its PCCP mains, the City of Montréal is taking steps to prevent pipe failures, while allowing for more fiscally responsible asset management in the future.

 

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PureRobotics™ – Pipeline Inspection

Robotic Pipeline Inspection

PureRobotics uses powerful modular robotic pipeline inspection systems that can be configured to inspect virtually any pipe application 12-inches (30.5 centimeters) and larger.

Assess & Address Pipeline Management Program

Assess & Address Pipeline Management Program

Pure Technologies is helping utilities manage their buried infrastructure through its Assess & Address which can often be implemented for only a fraction of the capital replacement cost.

Technical Paper

Beyond the Wires: A Sustainable Approach to Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Pipe Management

While evaluating wire breaks are an important part of PCCP management, it is important to acknowledge additional factors beyond wire breaks. By acknowledging additional condition factors, limitations of wire break assessment, and considering other rehabilitation approaches, there may be a more sustainable PCCP management approach (or combination of approaches).

After spending eight years assessing the condition of and monitoring 77 miles of 48-inch and larger PCCP with a variety of methods, WSSC has shifted its focus to 68 miles of 36- and 42-inch mains. Many of these assets have been in the ground for decades and have never been inspected for structural deterioration.

To assess the mains, WSSC is using PureRobotics™ equipped with electromagnetic (EM) sensors. The tool is also equipped with high-definition closed-circuit television (HD-CCTV), which allows WSSC to identify cracks of the inner concrete core and determine joint condition.

WSSC recently produced a video to demonstrate how the tool works and its role within the overall PCCP assessment program.

How the Technologies Work

The EM sensors on the robotic tool identify the quantity and location of broken wire wraps in PCCP pipelines. The wire wraps in PCCP are the main structural component – as wraps begin to deteriorate and break, the pipe section becomes weaker and more likely to fail catastrophically.

By identifying broken wire wraps, WSSC is able to repair or replace specific pipe sections when they reach a wire break limit. The robotics tool used by WSSC also has an inertial mapping unit, which allows damaged pipes to be located with very close location accuracy, usually within 3 feet.

After acquiring a baseline condition of its transmission mains, WSSC plans to install an Acoustic Fiber Optic (AFO) monitoring system to track ongoing deterioration. The AFO system records the sounds of wire wraps snapping, which allows WSSC to intervene and replace a pipe section when too many wire wraps snap in a short span – which indicates accelerating distress – or the amount wire breaks reaches a certain level.

WSSC’s PCCP program is one of the largest and most advanced infrastructure management programs in the industry; however the cost of assessing, monitoring and managing its most critical assets is roughly 6 percent of the $2-billion capital replacement estimates.

To date, WSSC’s inspections have shown that about 95 percent of pipes are in “like new” condition and less than 2 percent require any immediate rehabilitation or replacement. By identifying select distressed areas, WSSC was able to avoid a full replacement program and avoided massive capital replacement costs by rehabilitating the identified sections.

 

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Assess & Address Pipeline Management Program

Assess & Address Pipeline Management Program

Pure Technologies is helping utilities manage their buried infrastructure through its Assess & Address which can often be implemented for only a fraction of the capital replacement cost.

WSSC Logo

Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission Avoids Critical Failure Through the use of Fiber Optic Monitoring

To prevent critical water main failures, the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission (WSSC) has installed acoustic fiber optic cable in many of its Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Pipe (PCCP) transmission mains. This technology has prevented a number of major pipeline failures, most recently in Prince George’s County on a 54-inch transmission main.

PureRobotics™ – Pipeline Inspection

Robotic Pipeline Inspection

PureRobotics uses powerful modular robotic pipeline inspection systems that can be configured to inspect virtually any pipe application 12-inches (30.5 centimeters) and larger.

Ecuador coast picture

Providing reliable access to clean water is a challenge faced by many Ecuadorian utilities; pipeline ruptures, leaks and unplanned shutdowns are not only inconvenient, but also represent the loss of a critical resource. Beyond the challenge of providing clean water, utilities are also tasked with finding a reliable method to assess critical water pipelines for structural damage.

Unlike oil and gas pipelines – which are typically designed to allow for inspection – critical water transmission mains are often hard to access. Many water mains also lack redundancy, meaning they cannot be shut down for proper inspection.

The Scope of Interagua’s Program

In a comprehensive program starting in 2011, the authority of Guayaquil (operated by Interagua Ltd.) addressed the challenges surrounding their water service delivery by assessing their critical transmission mains. The proactive condition assessment program identified defects on Interagua’s large-diameter Steel and Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Pipe (PCCP) transmission mains through the use of advanced inline inspection.

Specifically, the project included the prescreening of all pipelines using inline leak detection, structural condition assessment on PCCP pipelines using electromagnetic (EM) technology and internal close-circuit television (CCTV) and broadband electromagnetic assessment of steel pipelines. Through the program, Interagua ensured service reliability in the long run but also helped advance the technology available for assessing in-service steel pipelines.

Although ensuring service reliability was the primary reason Interagua began the program, there were several other factors that contributed to the need for assessment. In terms of external factors, the critical pipelines were set in aggressive soil, which threatened to deteriorate their condition. The pipelines are also under a variety of loads and operating pressures due to the growth of the city; this adds additional strain and can lead to structural damage.

Operationally, the pipelines have no redundancy and cannot be shut down for scheduled preventative maintenance. This made the pipelines high-risk because any disruption would interrupt service indefinitely. Also, because there is no redundancy, the pipelines had been in service for several years without interruption; finding a reliable inspection method for in-service pipelines was crucial for Interagua.

Broadband Electromagnetic inspection

Interagua and Pure completed Broadband Electromagnetic inspection on 5 kilometers of steel pipeline.

Staff prepare to insert the PipeDiver® tool

Staff prepare to insert the PipeDiver® tool to identify deterioration in Interagua’s PCCP.

Prescreening Using Inline Leak Detection

To begin assessing their critical pipelines, Interagua and Pure Technologies partnered in 2011. The scope of the project covered Interagua’s most critical pipelines that run through the north of the city. These mains are made of both steel and Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Pipe (PCCP) in diameters of 2000-mm, 1800-mm, 1500-mm, 1250-mm and 1050-mm. Considering that the 2000-mm steel main is only 20 years old and has a cathodic protection, the project focused on the other pipe diameters.

In total, roughly 66 kilometers of pipeline was surveyed for leaks and air pockets, and a significant portion of this was also assessed for structural deterioration. The main objective of inspecting the pipelines was to identify the actual condition of the pipes, including the specific amount and location of distress. From the results, a rehabilitation, replacement and maintenance plan could be created to ensure long-term service reliability. The inspections also provided Interagua with actionable information about pipe condition that could not be attained through conventional engineering studies.

In order to locate leaks and air pockets on all 66 kilometers of the transmission mains, Interagua used SmartBall® technology, an acoustic free-flowing leak detection tool that operates while a pipeline remains in service. The primary goal of the survey was to identify critical leaks that could be prioritized for repair by Interagua.

Locating and repairing leaks helps to reduce non-revenue water (NRW) and preserve a scarce resource. However, repairing leaks early also increases pipeline reliability, since leaks are often a preliminary indication of a failure location, particularly in metallic pipe materials. Failures in metallic pipe are often preceded by a period of leakage, so identification of leaks on metallic pipelines has the added benefit of ensuring structural reliability and preventing costly pipe failures.

Through the use of inline leak detection, Interagua identified 44 total leaks and four air pockets in the 66 kilometers of inspection. Of these leaks, 16 were identified as small, 17 as medium-sized and 11 as large leaks. Of the identified leaks, 14 were located on the 1250-mm sections of steel pipe.

Identifying Structural Deterioration through Condition Assessment

To identify structural deterioration on its PCCP mains, Interagua used the PipeDiver® platform, a free-flowing electromagnetic (EM) condition assessment tool. The tool finds structural defects by identifying and locating wire breaks in PCCP; the presence of broken wires is the main indication that PCCP will eventually fail.

The tool is able to effectively determine the baseline condition of PCCP while the pipeline remains in service. The ability to inspect live pipelines was a major factor for Interagua, as many of their critical PCCP mains could not be taken out of service for maintenance or inspection.
In total, Interagua completed almost 10 kilometers of EM inspection on its 1500-mm and 1800-mm PCCP mains that run north of the city. The inspection identified 90 pipe sections with some level of distress out of a possible 1429 pipe sections; after thorough engineering analysis, it was determined that only nine pipe sections should be replaced.

Through the use of EM condition assessment, Interagua was able to determine that only 6 percent of its PCCP inventory had distress, while less than one percent required immediate action. This approach saved a huge amount of capital budget by avoiding unnecessary replacement and also restored pipeline reliability.

For its 1250-mm steel pipeline inventory, Intergua also completed robotic CCTV inspection and Broadband Electromagnetic (BEM) inspection to identify areas of concern. Inline CCTV provides information about internal pipe conditions, while BEM technology can determine the remaining wall thickness of steel pipe through outer coatings of up to 50-mm.

In total, 21 kilometers of steel pipe was assessed, including 5 kilometers of BEM inspection. The results showed that Interagua’s steel pipe inventory was in good overall condition and had sufficient remaining wall thickness. Through the use of inline leak detection, CCTV and BEM inspection, Interagua identified the baseline condition of its critical steel pipes, which helped in the development of a future maintenance and repair plan.

The Results

Interagua’s large-diameter pipeline management program was very successful and determined that the vast majority of its large-diameter assets did not need to be replaced. The approach of assessing the pipelines to locate specific, isolated problems prevented the costly replacement of pipe with significant remaining useful life.

In addition to successful results, the project has been instrumental in the development of a reliable condition assessment method for mortar-lined steel pipelines; based on the initial results, Interagua will continue to assess its steel pipelines using the most advanced condition assessment technologies available, including free-flowing condition assessment of steel pipelines, which was unavailable at the inception of the project.

By investing capital resources into a condition assessment program, Interagua has successfully extended the useful life of its system and restored asset value by repairing isolated pipe sections and determining that the majority of pipelines have no distress and have significant remaining useful life.

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Cast Iron Pipes

Managing Metallic Pipelines

Pure offers a number of leading edge technology options for assessing the condition of ferrous water and wastewater mains.

Assess & Address Pipeline Management Program

Assess & Address Pipeline Management Program

Pure Technologies is helping utilities manage their buried infrastructure through its Assess & Address which can often be implemented for only a fraction of the capital replacement cost.

Pipeline Inspection and Condition Assessment Services

Pipeline Leak Detection Systems

Highly accurate inline leak detection systems that can detect leaks and gas pockets in operational pipelines. These systems are used primarily on larger diameter water and wastewater transmission mains of all materials as well as oil & gas pipelines.

Industry reports also offer a bleak outlook about infrastructure in the United States; the American Society of Civil Engineers 2013 Report Card on America’s Infrastructure gave water and wastewater infrastructure a ‘poor’ rating and estimated that the cost to renew these systems would range from US $200 billion to US $1 trillion over the next 25 years.

While most of the discussion surrounding American water infrastructure involves pipe failures and the fiscal impact of renewal, water loss from leaking pipes is a major problem for utilities that often goes unnoticed. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimate that on average, between 15 and 20 percent of water never reaches the consumer, but is as high as 60 percent in some municipalities.

This loss accounts for a huge financial cost for operators in terms of billing and wasted energy used to pump and treat the water, but also represents the waste of a critical natural resource.

The Challenge for Dallas Water Utilities

In places like Dallas, TX, managing water loss is an important matter for utilities, especially in the summer months when users are affected by severe droughts and forced to restrict consumption. The droughts also bring extreme heat and dryness which dries out the soil and causes pipes to shift. This can lead to the accelerated development of leaks.

To mitigate this problem, Dallas Water Utilities (DWU) has completed an annual summer leak detection program since 2004 on its large-diameter water transmission mains that range in size from 12-inches to 84-inches. The inspection program focuses on a variety of piping materials including Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Pipe (PCCP), Cast Iron Pipe and Ductile Iron Pipe.

To date, DWU has inspected 100 miles of pipe in the program, locating 120 leaks. This has allowed for a major reduction in water loss and helped ensure service reliability.

Staff insert the Sahara® tool into a live pipeline

Pure Technologies staff insert the Sahara® tool into a live pipeline.

Water systems in large metropolitan areas are made up of thousands of miles of pipe varying in size; the distribution system, which delivers water directly to taps, is very large and features small-diameter pipe; transmission mains, which transport high volumes of water throughout an area, are made up of a smaller amount of large-diameter pipe. Because so many areas depend of these pipelines for supply and their high consequence of failure, maintaining transmission mains effectively is a high priority for operators. For DWU, the criticality of these pipelines was a major factor in adopting a leak detection program that focused on its large-diameter pipe.

According to a study completed by the American Water Works Association, leaks on large-diameter pipelines account for roughly 8 percent of the total leaks, but almost 50 percent of the total water lost from leakage. The discrepancy is created because transmission mains have a much higher capacity and operating pressure than distribution mains, meaning small leaks are actually leaking at a very high rate.

By focusing leak detection programs on large-diameter pipes, operators can achieve a much larger reduction in water loss by identifying and repairing evena single leak.

There are several methods of locating leaks on large-diameter pipelines. Non-invasive methods, such as correlators or listening sticks, work very well on small-diameter distribution mains but often lack the accuracy needed to address large pipes, as the sound of a leak does not travel as well as pipe diameter increases.

Conversely, inline leak detection methods aren’t well suited for distribution mains due to pipe size and complexity, but are very effective in accurately locating leaks on large-diameter transmission mains because they bring the leak detection sensor directly to the source of the leak, unlike non-invasive systems.

For inspection of its transmission mains, DWU uses Sahara® leak detection – a tethered platform that combines acoustic leak detection and inline CCTV – offered by Pure Technologies Ltd. The tool is non-destructive and is pulled by the flow of water by a small drag chute while the line remains in service. When the sensor is inserted into a tap, it remains tethered to the surface to allow for immediate confirmation of suspected leaks and gas pockets, internal pipe wall conditions and pipeline features by winching the sensor back and forth from the surface. The sensor is also tracked at ground level by a staff member, allowing for precise spot markings for excavations.

 

How DWU saves water using inline leak detection

“Since introduction to Dallas’ program in 2004, Sahara technology has been a reliable tool for locating and eliminating leaks on larger diameter pipelines,” says Randy Payton, Assistant Director of Dallas Water Utilities. “The program allows the Department to plan and prepare the repair in lieu of responding to a failure.”

The tool is capable of locating very small leaks due the sensitivity of the acoustic sensor. In terms of reducing water loss, small leaks may actually represent the best opportunity for long-term improvement. Leaks on large-diameter pipelines typically form and mature over a period of decades. They tend to grow larger over time, up until a point where the pipe fails or the leak surfaces.

Locating and repairing a large leak prevents it from leaking for the “tail end” of its life, and from failing catastrophically. Catching a leak while it is very small does this as well, but also prevents the decades of sustained water loss that would occur as it grows into a large leak. Using technologies that can locate small ‘pinhole’ sized leaks can identify small leaks early on before they grow into larger leaks or lead to pipeline failure.

In the annual pre-planning stage, DWU identifies the ideal access points needed for the inspections based on their knowledge of the Sahara platform from previous years – there are usually about 30 insertions through 2-inch access points each year. Inspections are usually done during the summer months when most of the leaks are developing, and higher volumes in the pipelines allow longer distances to be inspected. DWU also controls the water flow closely during inspections to optimize the inspection distance. After many years of inspection, DWU staff has become adept at identifying the best insertion points and controlling the flow rate to maximize the tool’s capabilities.

During tethered inspections, there is significant traffic control required when the transmission mains runs beneath busy streets, since the tool is controlled and tracked above the ground by staff members. To avoid major commuter disruptions, the City will reroute traffic and thoroughly plan the insertions to avoid high traffic times – for example, inspections frequently start in the mid-morning when traffic slows as opposed to during morning rush hour. Beyond traffic control, staff from DWU and Pure will often work on weekends when downtown Dallas is less busy.

There are also unavoidable environmental challenges that require adjustments. Sometimes the water main will run under a busy highway or an environmental obstacle like a river, making it impossible for the staff member on the ground to track the tool and mark exact leak locations. In this case, the operator needs to review potential leaks more closely by winching the tool back and forth to determine the exact location.

DWU’s leak detection program has been extremely successful, locating 120 leaks in the 100 inspected miles. The estimated water savings from these leaks is about 7.2 million gallons per day.

The CIty has also seen a 17 percent reduction in catastrophic water main failures, likely as a result of the proactive approach in fixing leaks. Leaks, particularly in metallic pipe materials, are often a preliminary indicator of a failure location as it is a preliminary sign of distress. The reduction in failures has reduced property loss claims and service interruptions, as well as reduced treatment and delivery costs.

“Several factors affect the success of leak detection,” adds Payton. “After nine years, the utility continues to be impressed with its accuracy within the varied environments and piping materials.”

 

Through continued commitment to leak detection on its transmission mains, DWU is improving service reliability and saving significant amounts of water. DWU also completes regular structural assessment of its transmission mains to identify distress that could lead to pipe failure.

 

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Pipeline Inspection and Condition Assessment Services

Pipeline Leak Detection Systems

Highly accurate inline leak detection systems that can detect leaks and gas pockets in operational pipelines. These systems are used primarily on larger diameter water and wastewater transmission mains of all materials as well as oil & gas pipelines.

Case Study

Case Study: Dallas Water Utilites Leak Detection Program

Dallas Water Utilties anually inspects its large-diameter water transmission mains for leaks using Sahara® technology. Through DWU’s efforts in identifying and repairing leaks, about 7.2 million gallons per day has been saved and major failures have been reduced by 17 percent.

Non-Revenue Water (NRW)

Non-Revenue Water (NRW)

Each day, billions of gallons of water are lost worldwide. Not only does this represent the loss of a precious resource that not everyone has access to; it represents a massive amount of lost revenue for the utilities that provide it.

For utilities like Foothill Municipal Water District (FMWD), which has no redundancy in its system, finding a reliable inspection method that provides condition data for the entire length of a steel pipeline is an important aspect of its condition assessment program.

FMWD covers about 22 square miles in the foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains, bordered between the City of Pasadena on the east and the City of Glendale on the south and west. The District serves approximately 86,000 people through its own member agencies.

In March 2013, FMWD successfully completed a 2.2-mile internal inspection and condition assessment of a 24-inch mortar-lined steel main to identify broad areas of wall loss. As part of the condition assessment, a structural evaluation was performed to determine whether the force main design satisfies AWWA M11 “Steel Pipe – A Guide for Design and Installation,” fourth edition standards. The results of this evaluation will help FMWD determine where to focus more detailed inspections in order to make detailed rehabilitation decisions for this force main.

To complete the inspection, FMWD used PureRobotics™ electromagnetic condition assessment equipped with PureEM™ technology and high-definition closed circuit television (HD-CCTV). The platform is a non-destructive, inline assessment tool that provides screening level wall data in the circumferential and axial directions of metallic pipelines.

By opting for an inline assessment in favor of traditional metallic inspection methods, FMWD has a baseline condition of the entire 2.2-mile main. After reviewing the EM data, FMWD was able to identify 17 EM anomalies that warrant additional investigation. The top 10 anomalies have been ranked based on the strength, area and repeatability of signal loss and visually using HD-CCTV. FMWD can now select the most appropriate locations to perform test pitting to obtain higher resolution data needed to evaluate rehabilitation or repair needs and determine the remaining useful life of the water main.

PureNET Overhead

FMWD inserts the PureRobotics tool for inspection.

Field Data Collection

During inspection, the tool remains tethered to the service and is controlled by an operator.

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PureRobotics™ – Pipeline Inspection

Robotic Pipeline Inspection

PureRobotics uses powerful modular robotic pipeline inspection systems that can be configured to inspect virtually any pipe application 12-inches (30.5 centimeters) and larger.

Assess & Address Pipeline Management Program

Assess & Address Pipeline Management Program

Pure Technologies is helping utilities manage their buried infrastructure through its Assess & Address which can often be implemented for only a fraction of the capital replacement cost.

Sewer access

Sewer Force Main Inspection

Pure Technologies has the complete portfolio for sewer force main and large diameter gravity main inspection. As the trusted global leader, we have successfully inspected thousands of miles of pipeline.

Inspection methods for BWP and steel pipe that locate cylinder corrosion have only recently been developed and commercialized. Specifically for BWP inspection, tools that can identify both bar breaks – which are an indication of corrosion – and corrosion on the steel cylinder are the best for completing a thorough condition assessment.

The City of Calgary provides water and wastewater services for over 1 million people in the Greater Calgary area; many of its large-diameter transmission and sewer force mains are made of PCCP and BWP.

In an annual proactive condition assessment program, the City of Calgary inspects its PCCP and BWP for signs of deterioration using electromagnetic (EM) technology.

In May 2013, the City inspected 1.6 miles (2.2 km) of the 30-inch (750-mm) BWP Memorial Feedermain using PureRobotics™, which is a powerful robotic system equipped with PureEM™ technology that can be configured to inspect a variety of pipelines and materials with different operational conditions. In BWP, it is capable of locating both bar breaks and cylinder corrosion.

In August 2013, the City verified the results with Pure Technologies by excavating a pipe section that was identified as distressed during data analysis.

The results from the inspection identified only 3 of 232 BWP pipe sections with evidence of bar breaks, as well as 3 additional pipe sections with evidence of cylinder anomalies.

Pure Technologies’ data from over 8,000 miles of pressure pipe condition assessment indicates that only a small percentage of pipes (less than 5 percent) are in need of repair and therefore have a significant remaining useful life. Condition assessment data also suggests that pipe distress is localized and a significant ROI can be achieved by locating and addressing isolated problems through structural inspection.

In August 2013, the most distressed pipe section was excavated for verification. The results had predicted bar breaks and cylinder corrosion, which can eventually lead to pipe failure if not repaired or replaced. The validation confirmed the broken bars and a large area of cylinder corrosion.

Staff verify the pipe condition

Pure Technologies staff verify the pipe condition

Pipe verification

Verification of one pipe revealed bar breaks and corrosion.

The City of Calgary was pleased with the results, and through condition assessment, has been able to identify and address individual distressed pipe sections on an otherwise serviceable transmission main. This has allowed the City to avoid a potential rupture of the main in a high consequence area while increasing service reliability and the useful life of the Memorial Feedermain.

The other sections identified in the inspection have been prioritized and will be verified in a future repair cycle.

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Case Study

Case Study: City of Calgary Memorial Feedermain

In August 2013, the City of Calgary and Pure Technologies verified bar breaks and cylinder corrosion on a 30-inch Bar-Wrapped Pipe section on the Memorial Feedermain. The distressed pipe was identified in an annual inspection completed in May 2013.

Pipeline Inspection and Condition Assessment Services

Pipeline Inspection and Condition Assessment Services

We provide water and wastewater organizations a comprehensive suite of technologies that provide actionable pipeline information to better understand the condition of their pipe.

Technical Paper

Failure Risk of Bar-Wrapped Pipe with Broken Bars and Corroded Cylinder

This study investigates the behavior of a deteriorating BWP under various levels of distress and various internal pressures. The results based on a 24-inch pipe transmission main, are used to define criteria to evaluate the performance of a damaged BWP. Based upon the finite element results obtained in this study, suggestions for future work are presented and discussed.

Baltimore County Department of Public Works (DPW) wrapped up a busy two-month inspection schedule in November 2012 after completing ten force main inspections using the SmartBall®, PipeDiver® and PureRobotics® technology platforms.

Twenty-three total inspections took place on ten different Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Pipe (PCCP) force mains over the inspection period, requiring extensive planning and organization between DPW and Pure.

SmartBall leak detection inspections were completed on nine force mains as part of the overall condition assessment of PCCP force mains. Initial leak and gas pocket detection is crucial in condition assessment, since the presence of leaks or gas pockets is often a preliminary indicator of a potential failure location.

Gas pockets in force mains are of significant concern as hydrogen sulfide gas within the wastewater may be converted to sulfuric acid by bacteria in the slime layer on the pipe wall, which may cause corrosion and eventual breakdown of the pipe’s exposed surface.

For structural condition assessment of the force mains, Pure Technologies used PipeDiver technology for six inspections and the PureRobotics platform for three inspections.Two electromagnetic platforms were used for the inspections to meet the different operational challenges at each force main.

Both tools identify areas of distress and quantify the amount of estimated wire breaks on PCCP force mains while allowing them to remain in service. Having the line remain in service is often important for force main condition assessments since most lack redundancy and the ability to be shut down for inspection.

In total, DPW and Pure Technologies completed just over 15 miles of SmartBall leak detection, almost 11 miles of PipeDiver condition assessment, and about 3 miles of robotics inspection. The pipe diameters varied for each force main, ranging from 16-inch to 42-inch PCCP.

Baltimore County is inspecting their force mains after entering into a Consent Decree brought forth by the U.S. Department of Justice, the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in September 2005. The consent decree stipulated that Baltimore County inspect all force mains in its collection system with one or more methodologies appropriate to the specific characteristics of each force main.

Although the Consent Decree stipulates that the force mains be inspected, it allowed Baltimore County the flexibility to specify the method or technology at the time the inspections are performed.

The Baltimore County DPW has taken this opportunity to go beyond a minimalist approach, choosing to inspect its force main inventory with advanced non-destructive condition assessment technologies, reaffirming their ongoing commitment to providing reliable service and preventing pipeline failures.

DPW’s sewer force main inspection program was featured in the November issue of Trenchless Technology. Click here to see the article.

 

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Sewer inspection hole

Sewer Force Main Inspection

Pure Technologies has the complete portfolio for sewer force main and large diameter gravity main inspection. As the trusted global leader, we have successfully inspected thousands of miles of pipeline.

The first PipeDiver project was recently completed on a fully operational prestressed concrete cylinder pipe (PCCP) wastewater force main for Baltimore County Department of Public Works. The inspection was completed as part of a comprehensive assessment of a 54-inch force main that also included Pure’s SmartBall® technology.

September 2011

PipeDiver’s electromagnetic assessment sensors provide a non-destructive method of evaluating the baseline condition of the prestressing wire (the primary structural component of PCCP) by estimating the quantity and location of wire breaks for each pipe section.

PipeDiver Insertion
“This is a significant advancement in wastewater force main condition assessment,” said Travis Wagner, P.E., Pure’s wastewater assessment leader. “The comprehensive condition assessment of PCCP force mains has historically proven difficult for wastewater collection system owners/operators since unlike potable water transmission mains, force mains generally lack redundancy and therefore, the ability to shut down the pipeline for a traditional comprehensive PCCP assessment.”

Thorough force main inspections often require significant operational and/or financial expenditures in order to bypass the wastewater flow via temporary pumping or a piped diversion. Through the successful implementation of the SmartBall and PipeDiver tools, PCCP force main owners/operators now have the ability to conduct comprehensive condition assessments of their wastewater PCCP assets with a significantly lower operational impact.

 

Case Study

Case Study

Baltimore County – Sewer Force Main Assessment

As part of Baltimore County, Maryland’s Wastewater Force Main Asessment Program, Pure Technologies inspected the 54-inch Patapsco PCCP Force Main using the SmartBall® and PipeDiver® pipeline assessment tools.